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Now let's have a closer look at what is considered "available grammar literature". For example, an English coursebook "Language Leader", Intermediate Level. The book itself is not bad, even quite good, but its grammar components, as always, are not worth much.

The second chapter has an exercise in which you are supposed to choose between Present Perfect and Past Simple. One of the tasks reads as follows:

I have known/knew him for last 10 years.

This is the brightest evidence of pulpness, because:

A) the correct option, which is Present Perfect Continuous, is not included.
B) of two included options the book considers correct the wrong one (Present Perfect).

The fact that "to know" is considered by some a "stative" verb, does not mean anything for a sound mind (4500 instances of stative verbs in continuous tenses in COHA, if you forgot). If you are still not ready to use the proper Present Perfect Continuous here, give me the reasons why you go for Present Perfect in this sentence. My students said "OK, if we HAVE to choose between those two stupid options, it should be Past Simple, because it's Past Simple, that doesn't tell the aspects, and may be either". So, what are your reasons?

And before you start throwing heavy stuff at me, go google those two options. The phrases "I knew him for many years" and "I have known him for many years" produce virtually equal number of results.
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Comments  (Page 4) 
rinoceronte Princeton, Cambridge and Oxford people are mere native speakers
Like Micheal McCarthy for example?. He wrote several of the Cambridge books I have :-

Michael McCarthy is a Professor of Applied Linguistics at the University of Nottingham in the UK. His main research interests are applied linguistics, discourse analysis, and spoken corpus linguistics. Among his published works are Language as Discourse: Perspectives for Language Teaching (Longman), English Vocabulary in Use (Cambridge), Issues in Applied Linguistics (Cambridge) and the new coursebook Touchstone (Cambridge).

He is a mere native speaker?
AnonymousLike Micheal McCarthy for example?. He wrote several of the Cambridge books I have :-Michael McCarthy is a Professor of Applied Linguistics at the University of Nottingham in the UK. His main research interests are applied linguistics, discourse analysis, and spoken corpus linguistics. Among his published works are Language as Discourse: Perspectives for Language Teaching (Longman), English Vocabulary in Use (Cambridge), Issues in Applied Linguistics (Cambridge) and the new coursebook Touchstone (Cambridge).He is a mere native speaker?
Look, world's verb system has been being based on times and aspects for milleniums. But English natives noticed that only 300 years ago:
http://community.livejournal.com/real_english/16566.html

What Oxford is able to compensate this?

What does McCarthy say about aspects? English verb system? How does he define "tense"? Does he ignore "stative verbs rule"? How does he define English tenses?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Yes I have already seen your website but is there anyone else that thinks as you do?
rinoceronteWhat Oxford is able to compensate this?
I only know of Oxford in the UK - there may be others. Not sure what you are asking here.
rinoceronteWhat does McCarthy say about aspects? English verb system? How does he define "tense"? Does he ignore "stative verbs rule"? How does he define English tenses?
I could copy and paste those things from his book as I have it on disc but I do not have the time or the inclination. Please buy it if you really want to know. You may learn some useful grammar.
AnonymousYes I have already seen your website but is there anyone else that thinks as you do?
I have no idea.
AnonymousI could copy and paste those things from his book as I have it on disc but I do not have the time or the inclination. Please buy it if you really want to know. You may learn some useful grammar.
If you are so enthusiastic about this man, I thought you might already have the answers. Don't bother.

To me, "I knew him for may years" means or implies that I no longer know him, but "I have known him for many years" means that you still know him. That's not an insignificant difference.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.