+0
Hi there!

Is this sentence grammatically correct? She wrote twenty novels (of which two were apparently unpublished), three poems and a play. (I have doubts about the relative clause between brackets.
1 2
Comments  
It's fine.

You may want to replace the brackets with commas or m-dashes.
Hi,

Is this sentence grammatically correct? She wrote twenty novels (of which two were apparently unpublished), three poems and a play. (I have doubts about the relative clause between brackets.

It's not good for your English grammar to get into the habit of using brackets. Why not say it this way?

She wrote three poems , a play, and twenty novels of which two were apparently unpublished.

Best wishes, Clive
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Thanks to both of you. Clive, I agree with you, it's better to get rid of the brackets.
CliveShe wrote three poems , a play, and twenty novels of which two were apparently unpublished.
Hi Clive

To my mind a comma is needed: She wrote three poems , a play, and twenty novels, of which two were apparently unpublished.

CB
Is it an American thing then to prefer "... 20 novels, two of which... " instead of "of which two"?

I don't feel the original is wrong in any way, but "two of which" sounds so much more natural!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Grammar GeekIs it an American thing then to prefer "... 20 novels, two of which... " instead of "of which two"?

I don't feel the original is wrong in any way, but "two of which" sounds so much more natural!
I agree.
Grammar GeekIs it an American thing then to prefer "... 20 novels, two of which... " instead of "of which two"?
Hi GG

No, I think "of which two" was more common in the 19th century.Emotion: smile "Two of which" is more common in BrE as well.

CB
So, if it "of which two" was more usual in the 19th century, I'll change to "two of which" but the rest of the sentence doesn't change, does it?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more