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I was never really good in the grammar part of english classes, so I sign up for a Comp class, hoping to better my skills. Well, it's getting there, but on a recent essay I caught heck trying to figure out something so simple-verb tenses.

I want to say something to the nature of: This seems hopeful, although we still haven't ____ the books. While that wasn't my actual sentence, it was to the same degree. Would I use got? Gotten? It's throwing me for a flip. I'd use got in everyday conversation, but I know grammar defy's everyday conversation...

Thanks in advance.
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Hi,

I'd say although we still haven't _got___ the books. 'Got' is fine. If you live in the USA, you might hear people say 'gotten' in a sentence like this.


grammar defy's everyday conversation... Yeah, ain't it the truth! But sometimes, when you have something really important to say, it can help people to understand you better.

Best wishes, Clive
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For American English:

If you say you still haven't got the books, you're saying you still don't have them.
If you say you still haven't gotten the books, you're saying you still haven't received them (from whoever is going to deliver them).

They are very similar. It may not make a difference in the context you are working with.

CJ