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As long, brethren, as the moon and sun have not arisen in the world, just as long is there no shining forth a great light of great radiance.

(What Buddhists Believe, by Dr. K. Sri Dhammananda)


What is the structure of this sentence? How can I rewrite it in a simpler way?

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Please check that you have typed this quotation correctly.I found versions online that are a little different.

Clive

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green chalk 180What is the structure of this sentence?

It is not a sentence. It is two introductory clauses with no main clause.

green chalk 180How can I rewrite it in a simpler way?

It does not say anything, so it can't be rewritten. Is it a translation?

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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

28. 28 ! WHAT BUDDHISTS BELIEVE ‘As long, brethren, as the moon and sun have not arisen in the world, just as long is there no shining forth a great light of great radiance. There prevails gross darkness, the darkness of bewilderment. Night is not distinguishable from the day, nor the month, the half-moon and the seasons of the years from each other.’ ‘But, brethren, when the moon and sun arise in the world, then a great light of great radiance shines forth. Gross darkness, the darkness of bewilderment, is no more: Then are months and the half-moon and the seasons of years.’ ‘Just so, brethren, as long as a Buddha, who is an Arahant, a Buddha Supreme, arises not, there is no shining forth a great light of great radiance. But gross darkness, the darkness of bewilderment, prevails. There is no pro- claiming, no teaching, no showing forth, no setting up, no opening up, no analysis, no making clear of the Four Noble Truths.’ ‘What Four?The NobleTruth of Suffering, the Arising of Suffering, the Ceasing of Suffering, and the Approach to the Ceasing of Suffering.’ ‘Wherefore, brethren, do you exert yourselves to realize “This is suffering; this is the arising of suffering; this is the ceasing of suffering; this is the approach to the ceasing of suffering”.’

(What Buddhists Believe, by Dr. K. Sri Dhammananda)

This seems to be a translation into rather archaic English. I think the original text is probably also archaic.

As long, brethren, as the moon and sun have not arisen in the world, just as long is there no shining forth a great light of great radiance.

What is the structure of this sentence? It's a subordinate clause followed by a main clause. The key to understanding the main clause is to realize that the words 'is there ' are a rather poetical reversal of 'there is', which is the more common word order. How can I rewrite it in a simpler way? For as long as the moon and sun have not yet arisen in the world, a great light of great radiance has not yet shone forth. Note that the next verse continues this thought.by saying this.. 'But, brethren, when the Moon and Sun arise in the world then a great light of great radiance shines forth. Gross darkness, the darkness of bewilderment, is no more. " Clive
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anonymousIt is not a sentence.

It is a sentence. Clive is right, as usual.

Thank you so much, Clive!

Wish you great success!

As long, brethren, as the moon and sun have not arisen in the world, just as long is there no shining forth a great light of great radiance. There prevails gross darkness, the darkness of bewilderment. Night is not distinguishable from the day, nor the month, the half-moon and the seasons of the years from each other.’


Again, Mr. Clive, can you explain more about the underlined part of the sentence.

1. Why are the words 'just as long' used? Is it impossible without using or putting them in this sentence?

2. Does the expression 'no shining forth' modify 'a great light of great radiance'?

3. With the use of the same words within this sentence, how can we rewrite in an easier way?


Thanks in advance, Clive, and other teachers!

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Again, Mr. Clive, can you explain more about the underlined part of the sentence.

1. Why are the words 'just as long' used? just as long means 'for the same amount of time as mentioned earlier in in the sentence'.

Is it impossible without using or putting them in this sentence? I think it's possible to omit them in this sentence. But retaining them makes the sentence sound more impressive and more elegant, I think.

2. Does the expression 'no shining forth' modify 'a great light of great radiance'? I think not. I interpret it this way. no shining forth of a great light of great radiance. To me, shining is a gerund. This kind of writing is very hard for modern readers to interpret correctly.

3. With the use of the same words within this sentence, how can we rewrite in an easier way? I think that now it's your turn to try.OK?

Clive

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