+0

Someone who walks past you without a glance in a village will, 100 metres away, walking on the tow path alongside the canal, invariably smile, greet and maybe even offer to help you through the next lock gate.

In this sentence, the main subject is 'someone' and the auxiliary verb is 'will' and the main verbs are 'smile', 'greet' and 'offer'.

Could you give me an explanation about the -ing form of walk in the phrase in italic?

Here is the passage containing this sentence.

+1
Nhật BìnhCould you give me an explanation about the -ing form of walk in the phrase in italic?

It is a participle clause, so called because it begins with a participle verb form. Such clauses lack an auxiliary verb, and they inherit their subject from the main clause. They do not have an explicitly stated relationship to the main clause as might be expressed with a conjunction or subordinator, but the implicit relationship can be inferred from the situation described by the text itself.

Nhật BìnhSomeone who walks past you without a glance in a village will, 100 metres away, walking on the tow path alongside the canal, invariably smile, greet and maybe even offer to help you through the next lock gate.

Thus, walking on the tow path alongside the canal will be interpreted by a reader as

as they (i.e. 'someone') are walking on the tow path alongside the canal

Here the relationship is one of temporal simultaneity. This happens while/as other things are happening.

CJ

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

I get it.

Here may be the meaning of the whole sentence: Someone often walks past you without caring about your presence will smile, greet... as he/she walks on the towpath alongside the canal, mayn't it?

Nhật Bình

I get it.

Here may be the meaning of the whole sentence: Someone often walks past you without caring about your presence (in other situations) will smile, greet... as he/she walks on the towpath alongside the canal, mayn't it?

Correct.

("mayn't" is almost non-existent in modern English.)

CJ

CalifJim"mayn't" is almost non-existent in modern English.

How about mightn't and oughtn't?

Thank you.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Nhật Bình
CalifJim"mayn't" is almost non-existent in modern English.

How about mightn't and oughtn't?

Thank you.

Same answer I'm afraid. Emotion: sad

These are all fading out of use. "mayn't" is probably the farthest gone, however, of the three mentioned in this thread.

CJ

Could you give me some more examples of participle clauses so that I can know how to use this.

I'm still rather confused about its position in a sentence.

Nhật Bình

Could you give me some more examples of participle clauses so that I can know how to use this.

I'm still rather confused about its position in a sentence. Almost always at the beginning or at the end of the sentence.

https://www.google.com/search?ei=Vfa7X9fzFZCSsAX63oaoDQ&q=participle+clauses+cambridge&oq=participle+clauses&gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQARgFMgQIABBHMgQIABBHMgQIABBHMgQIABBHMgQIABBHMgQIABBHMgQIABBHMgQIABBHUABYAGDIYmgAcAJ4AIABAIgBAJIBAJgBAKoBB2d3cy13aXrIAQjAAQE&sclient=psy-ab

CJ

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.