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1. The learning to be complete, thus, requires an ability to observe and analyse the surroundings, both their glamour and brutality.

Could you explain to me the phrase in italic?

2. It's time the boss........for the next meeting.

A. Must leave

B. Should have left

C. Was leaving

D. Were to leave.

The key is C. Why is it?

3. Either you or some else in the staff......responsible for the reception at the next conference.

A. Is

B. Have to be

C. Are

D. Ought to have been

Is the correct answer C?

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Nhật Bình1. The learning to be complete, thus, requires an ability to observe and analyse the surroundings, both their glamour and brutality.

It is very literary English and quite old-fashioned. Here is a paraphrase.

You will know when your learning is complete when you have the ability to closely observe the environment around you.

Nhật Bình2. It's time the boss........for the next meeting.

The most common way of phrasing this is: It's time for the boss to leave for the next meeting.

"were leaving" is an alternative, but more formal. It is a subjunctive mood form that indicates that it is a suggestion.

Nhật Bình3. Either you or some else in the staff......responsible for the reception at the next conference.

is

When either-or joins two subjects to form a compound subject, the verb used should agree with the part closest to it.

"someone else" is singular.

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Nhật Bình2. It's time

The textbook answer is to use the past tense after the idiom "It's time" or "It's high time".

Quite frankly, it's time you learned to cook something besides chicken stir-fry.
It's high time we stopped framing work-and-family discussions as women's issues.
It's time Granholm grabbed the mike and told the people not to believe the hype.
It's high time they called attention to what makes their little city great.
It's time we started to treat colluding laborers the same way we treat business.

In reality you'll also see the present tense used in this context.

CJ

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Comments  

Thank you a lot.🥰

Could you check my example sentence?

The course only to be finished is when your child can do quick arithmetic calculations.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thank you very much.

CalifJimThe textbook answer is to use the past tense after the idiom "It's time" or "It's high time".

I was taught to use the idiom "It's time" or "It's high time" in this way.

CalifJimIn reality you'll also see the present tense used in this context.

Could you elaborate on it? The present tense can also be used after "It's time" and "It's high time"?

Also, could you check my sentence example? Emotion: smile

Nhật BìnhCould you elaborate on it? The present tense can also be used after "It's time" and "It's high time"?

Yes.

Textbook: It's time we left.
In newspapers, magazines, etc.:
It's time we left. OR It's time we leave.

Needless to say, if it's on an English exam, use the textbook formula. Emotion: wink

CJ

Nhật BìnhAlso, could you check my sentence example?

You mean the italicized "The learning to be complete"?

I think it's a mistake. It should be

For the learning to be complete

It's an infinitive clause. The complementizer 'for' allows a subject of the infinitive to be inserted. The clause itself is the subject of 'requires'.

All in all, it's a strange and awkward arrangement. I would not attempt to write such a sentence myself.

CJ

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