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Looking for grammar synonyms: Fractional Numerals (like,say, 2.555) combined with the idea 'times' and/'fold'

Examples:

The amount of students / number of schools increased / decreased in 1900 by a factor of 2.555.
The amount of students / number of schools increased / decreased in 1900 by as much as 2.555.
The amount of students / number of schools increased / decreased in 1900 by as many as 2.555 times.

Any ideas to add anything in this sense? - I'm not quite certain that the last two sentences are correct.
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Comments  
The number of students/schools...
,,,increased by a factor of 2.555.
...increased by 255% (probably the most common way used by the general public)
,,,multiplied by 2.555.
...increased by over two-fold.
...more than doubled.
cuneiformThe amount of students / number of schools increased / decreased in 1900 by as much as 2.555.
If you had 20 students and they "increased by as much as 2.555", you now have 22.555 students. I'd hate to be the 0.555 student. Emotion: big smile

You could also just state the actual numbers: The number of students increased 50 from 830 to 880.
Thanks. I' haven't been so much developed in English so far.
Is all that a specie of US-English?
You say: "If you had 20 students and they "increased by as much as 2.555", you now have 22.555 students. I'd hate to be the 0.555 student."

Actually, I have to manage some statistical data. No human fractionals have been meant. However, while analyzing figures like 200,000 students and/or 10,000 schools and comparing them in different years, one has to divide them mathematically.
I can't see anything bad while saying: The amount of student increased / decreased in some years by a factor of 2.555.
Starting with 100,000 students, it would thus designate only 255,500 students. It is also quite normal in sociology to mention fractional parts in order to indicate the proper birth rates to support the non-extinction mode of reproduction, such as 2.3 or 2.5, but not ultimately 3 persons per family if thinking statistically.
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I'd agree, saying The amount of students / number of schools increased / decreased in 1900 by as much as 2.555 implies though statistically a very special case, thus meaning, i.g., the number of schools per village in an area while diving the whole number of schools through the number of villages in that area.
cuneiformThe amount of student increased / decreased in some years by a factor of 2.555.Starting with 100,000 students, it would thus designate only 255,500 students.
Right. I completely understood what you wanted to say. It's obvious that you didn't mean a fractional student/school. My point is that you can't leave out the word "times" or "factor of". I quoted your example in which the phrase "factor of" was missing. As you said, there's nothing bad about saying "by a factor of 2.555." Emotion: smile
For whatever it is worth, I'd approach the type of question such as your this way:
Whether your target noun is "students", or any specific group of people, when we consider a quantifier, there are certain idiomatic patterns that we should follow, depending on context constructions. "Amount of student ", even not wrong grammatically, sounded a bit off to my ear. I think the typical patterns are, for instance:the total population of / percentage of / number of and etc.
Typical:
"The percentage of [Asian students] [ participated in the program ] decreased as much as 2.555 % in 1900"
Quantifier Target noun Participle phrase Active Verb adverbial phrase
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Nice to hear about your ideas. My text is a statistical one and has something with a play of "students" and "schools" to do within 20 Letter pages, in other words, a lot of times within a single page. Even as a foreigner, I feel that "amount" though a scientific category, "will" not be applied willingly to people, but I am looking for a possibly reach variability and variations within this context.

Your sentence "The percentage of [Asian students] [ participated in the program ] decreased as much as 2.555% in 1900"

forces me to further ask you about the following: decreased as much as 2.555%
Is that absolutely correct? Meaning the absence of the relationship preposition BY, i.e., probably it should be inserted or not at all, like decreased by as much as 2.555% or decreased as much as by 2.555% ?! Can one be certain apropos of this question?

cuneiformMy text is a statistical one and has something with a play of "students" and "schools" to do within 20 Letter pages, in other words, a lot of times within a single page. Even as a foreigner, I feel that "amount" though a scientific category, "will" not be applied willingly to people, but I am looking for a possibly reach variability and variations within this context.
I'm sorry to say it, but this is completely unintelligible. The bold parts make no sense. Emotion: tongue tied
cuneiform I feel that "amount" though a scientific category
"Amount" is not a "scientific category." It's a word that refers to non-countable nouns along with "much" and "little." Students and schools are countable nouns, which are referred to by number and terms like "many" and "few." You cannot justify breaking the rules of English on statistical or scientific grounds.
cuneiformYour sentence "The percentage of [Asian students] [ participated in the program ] decreased as much as 2.555% in 1900"forces me to further ask you about the following: decreased as much as 2.555%Is that absolutely correct? Meaning the absence of the relationship preposition BY, i.e., probably it should be inserted or not at all, like decreased by as much as 2.555% or decreased as much as by 2.555% ?!
When speaking of increases or decreases in terms of percent, "by" is optional: Sales increased (by) 15%.
cuneiformCan one be certain apropos of this question?
Yes, one can be certain about this. I suggest you try speaking more simply. I know you're eager to sound intelligent, but the result is you're not being understood. We want to help you though! Emotion: smile
I have to do not only with percentages, but also with factors, as you know.
I cannot write in everyday or conversational English, as the text is a translation to be then published.
Therefore, I have to strictly distinguish between conversational and written English.
Be certain, I studied well some 40 years ago most valuable books on the subject, like King's English, Fowler's Modern English Usage , The Chicago Manual of Style , etc.
Apropos of the notion "scientific". On the continent, philosophy - as that by Hegel who treated many categories, among them also "Quantity" - belongs to positive sciences.
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