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This is a philosophical question for grammarians. Is there any grammatical difference between the following two sentences?

Henry's favorite shirt is the color of the sky.
Henry's favorite color is the color of the sky.

I suspect the correct answer is that there is no grammatical difference between the two.

Why is this significant? Because, as those of you who know anything about the philosophical concept of logical form (LF) can confirm, these two sentences differ fairly dramatically in logical form. If they don't differ grammatically, then contrary to what some experts have argued, grammar doesn't determine LF.

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Thank you.
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AnonymousHenry's favorite shirt is the color of the sky.
Henry's favorite color is the color of the sky.
The issue is the dual nature of the verb "be".
The first accepts a predicate adjective, meaning "possesses the quality, or characteristic of" I am hungry. I am sad. (I am not hunger or sadness)

The second accepts a predicate noun, and means "equivalent to, or identical to". Martin Doyle is the president of ABC Co. (He may or may not be presidential.)
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Well said; well explained.