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Hello there,

I have a question regarding a caption I once composed myself for a picture. The picture was of my own grandmother who passed away a few months ago. The caption said:

"Hadn't she left us so soon, the world around us would've been more peaceful."

I quite simply want to know whether or not this phrase is grammatically correct. I do not wish to know any alternatives since I know I can write something else myself therefore my concern is particularly directed towards this phrase.

Thank you in advance.
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Anonymous"Hadn't she left us so soon, the world around us would've been more peaceful."
The grammar is not incorrect, but the sentence is not idiomatic.
It sounds like you're starting to ask us a question. I don't think you can use the contraction here.
Had she not left / Had not she left (These seem to work as conditionals.)

Had she not left us so soon, the world would be a more peaceful place.

"The world would have been more peaceful" describes a past time.

It's not clear what you mean to say.

If she had not died ten years ago, the world would have been more peaceful five years ago.

I don't think this is what you mean.

We say things like, "Had XXX not won the election, things would have turned out differently."
With something like this, "turned out" is in the past, but it's implied that the condition continues into the present.
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AnonymousI quite simply want to know whether or not this phrase is grammatically correct. I do not wish to know any alternatives
No, it is not correct.

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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I wouldn't say it is wrong, but I think a naive speaker is unlikely to say it.

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Is this grammatically correct-If Lisa had'nt of lied, she would have gone to the party

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

What is wrong grammatically with the following sentences: The loss prevention agent told us we couldn't leave until the police arrived. Sgt. Hauser asked me what I was doing on my days off.

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is the phrase be best grammatically correct?

Yes, but it's hard to think of a context in which it would make sense to say just those two words.

eg You can't just walk into a room and say 'Be best!" People will think you are crazy!

Can you think of a sentence that could contain this phrase?

Clive

Is this phrase grammatically correct and is spelling accurate?

"Please share it among other interested parties appropriately"


Thank you for your help!

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