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Hi,

One of the posts said something like this:

"The sentence is grammatically correct but is not correct in terms of punctuation correctness."

Can you give me one example of that or two examples for each version?
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The first is incorrectly punctuated; the second is correct:

Mister Micawber, is my name -- Mister Micawber is my name.
I want to tell you that: it is a famous name -- I want to tell you that it is a famous name.
"Hello". He said. -- "Hello," he said.

etc.
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Thank you, Mr. MM.

If you look at the original post, it asked for examples that are grammatically correct but at the same instance, are not correct in punctuations. In all due respect, don't tell me the first examples of your post are correct in terms of their punctuations.

Mister Micawber, is my name - not correct both grammatically and in punctuations.

I want to tell you that: it is a famous name - not correct in both respects but correct in their meaning that Mr. MM is famous in this forum.

"Hello". He said. - Is somewhat correct grammatically but repulsive in terms of its punctuations.

Can you supply me an example of a sentence that is correct grammatically but not in terms of its punctuations?
Please read your own post and mine a little more carefully. You asked for
"The sentence is grammatically correct but is not correct in terms of punctuation correctness."
Can you give me one example of that or two examples for each version?
And I gave you three examples of sentences that are grammatically correct but not correct in terms of punctuation, along with the correct version of each:
Mister Micawber, is my name -- Mister Micawber is my name.
I want to tell you that: it is a famous name -- I want to tell you that it is a famous name.
"Hello". He said.

Those are three examples...
...of a sentence that is correct grammatically but not in terms of its punctuations
.