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Hi,

My book suggests this:

"we do not usually put commas between grammatically seperate sentences"

"Whether or not the second clause is considered "grammatically separate" depends on the word or phrase that joins it to the first. "

Question1:

are the following sentences correct?

Question2:

Is the above the only way to define whether or not the second clause is considered "grammatically separate?

Sentence1:

Thank you for your email, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Sentence2:

Thank you for your email. Also, I look forward to hearing from you.

thanks
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Your sentences are certainly correct, uktuos, but what the rule is saying is this, I think:

(X) Thank you for your email, I look forward to hearing from you again. -- No good. There is a comma between independent clauses (= 'grammatically separate sentences') but no word or phrase (= conjunction)

Thank you for your email, and I look forward to hearing from you again. -- Here, we can put a comma between 2 independent clauses which are distinguished by the coordinating conjunction 'and'.

Thank you for your email because I was looking forward to hearing from you again. -- Here we needn't put a comma because the 'word or phrase' ('because') is a subordinating conjunction this time, and the 2nd clause is not grammatically separate.
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thank you for your answer

can I ask you a further question?

is the following statement true?

"Whether or not 2 clauses are "grammatically separate" depends on the word or phrase that joins them. "

So,

(clause 1) Thank you for your email.

(clause 2) I look forward to hearing from you.

when I use "and" to join them (like sentence 1), 2 clauses are not grammatically separate

when I use "also" to join them (like sentence 1), 2 clauses are grammatically separate

Correct?

thanks
No, they are grammatically separate (= independent) in both cases. That is how I understand you source's terminology.

(Please note that I have changed your sentences slightly to make them more natural utterances:)

Thank you for your email, and I look forward to hearing from you again. -- 2 independent clauses punctuated as one compound sentence.

Thank you for your email. And I look forward to hearing from you again. -- 2 independent clauses punctuated as two simple sentences.