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"Granted that the firm has not broken the law, is the law what it should be?"

Q1. I can't exactly figure out this sentence? Would you paraphrase it for me?

Q2. Shouldn't "is" be changed into "isn't" to make sense more naturally?

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The writer is conceding that the firm has not broken the law, but is asking, given this, whether the law is adequate.

"isn't the law what it should be?" wouldn't be right here. It implies a suggestion/belief that the law might be what it should be, which is not what the writer wishes to imply.

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Thank you for your answer Mr. GPY Emotion: smile But I'm not a little clear.

Then, "Granted" should be interpreted as, say, "Because" rather than "Even though"? Would you rephrase that sentence for me to understand the meaning clearly?

thanks2Then, "Granted" should be interpreted as, say, "Because" rather than "Even though"? Would you rephrase that sentence for me to understand the meaning clearly?

It doesn't mean either of those, not exactly. "granted that X" means "conceding/accepting/allowing that X". It expresses acceptance or concession, at least for the present purposes, or the purposes of the argument that follows, that X is true.

I'm a non-native speaker, so what isn't difficult for you could be difficult for me. Please understand Emotion: smile

Then can I rephrase that sentence like this: "I accept that the company has not broken the law, so the law isn't fair."?

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thanks2Then can I rephrase that sentence like this: "I accept that the company has not broken the law, so the law isn't fair."?

This paraphrase is consistent with the intent of the original sentence. However, "I accept that ~" has a somewhat more personal feel (due to the use of "I"), as well as potentially a more conclusive feel, compared to "Granted that ~". Also, the statement "the law isn't fair" is more definite than the question "is the law what it should be?".

I'm sorry but I'm still not clear.

May I request your version of that sentence, Mr. GPY? Or some other native speakers will do. Please give me a help:)