1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
It is one of the reasons I have found it peculiar that some people refer to their garden as their ... land behind or in front of a house as a garden and reserve 'yard' for uncultivated, paved or tarmac enclosures.

This is consistent with my usage of "yard", though I do not have the overgeneralized CommonwealthE usage of "garden". I find it peculiar that my fellow Americans speak of houses with "front yards" and "side yards", but "backyard" (a three-syllable word) is a fixed term in my dialect. I have always called the GenAm "front yard" a "lawn", provided it's not too small in area and isn't too unkempt-looking.

Yo Michael Hamm, what do you call the patch of green in front of a house?
It is one of the reasons I have found it ... garden and reserve 'yard' for uncultivated, paved or tarmac enclosures.

This is consistent with my usage of "yard", though I do not have the overgeneralized CommonwealthE usage of "garden". I ... have always called the GenAm "front yard" a "lawn", provided it's not too small in area and isn't too unkempt-looking.

What do you call a front yard that contains only dirt and rocks? I had one of those in Washington.
There is no cultivated garden anywhere around my house only a front yard and a back yard. Both have areas of lawn, but there's more concrete than grass in both front and rear. There are narrow paved spaces on both sides of the house, but they are only good for walkways and a bit of temporary storage.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
This is consistent with my usage of "yard", though I ... it's not too small in area and isn't too unkempt-looking.

What do you call a front yard that contains only dirt and rocks? I had one of those in Washington.

That's a tough one. Maybe "the area in front of the house with all the dirt and rocks"? This is why I like initialisms.
I find this use of "garden" peculiar. There are vegetable gardens, flower gardens, rose gardens, even native plant gardens, but a lawn of manicured grass is not a "garden". A yard adjacent to a house may contain one or more gardens, a lawn, some walkways, and a shrubbery.
I find this use of "garden" peculiar. There are vegetable gardens, flower gardens, rose gardens, even native plant gardens, but ... A yard adjacent to a house may contain one or more gardens, a lawn, some walkways, and a shrubbery.

The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish and attached to a house, it's a garden. Just a straggly lawn and a tired bit of privet? A garden., without a doubt. A yard, on the other hand, must certainly be enclosed (usually with a higher wall than a garden) and almost certainly paved, as Peter says.

Ross Howard
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I find this use of "garden" peculiar. There are vegetable ... or more gardens, a lawn, some walkways, and a shrubbery.

The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish and attached to a house, it's a garden. Just a ... hand, must certainly be enclosed (usually with a higher wall than a garden) and almost certainly paved, as Peter says.

And "a shrubbery" is a joke form Python, right? "A shrub" in AmE, anyway. "Shrubbery" in AmE is a mass noun, like "furniture" or "luggage", so it can't use an "a".

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish ... than a garden) and almost certainly paved, as Peter says.

And "a shrubbery" is a joke form Python, right? "A shrub" in AmE, anyway. "Shrubbery" in AmE is a mass noun, like "furniture" or "luggage", so it can't use an "a".

Same in BrE you can't have "a shrubbery" any more than you can have "a foliage" or, perhaps more aptly, "a plumage".

Ross Howard
This is consistent with my usage of "yard", though I ... it's not too small in area and isn't too unkempt-looking.

What do you call a front yard that contains only dirt and rocks? I had one of those in Washington. ... spaces on both sides of the house, but they are only good for walkways and a bit of temporary storage.

The house I was born in was on a corner, and because my father was a keen gardener, had gardens front, back and side. For most of the time, yard and garden were interchangeable words. The slight difference would come out in sentences such as: "Someone is trying to get into your back yard through the gate" and "Somebody is scrumping apples from one of the trees in your back garden". I suppose 'yard' referred to the area, and 'garden' to what was in it.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
Try out our live chat room.
What do you call a front yard that contains only dirt and rocks? I hadone of those in Washington.

That's a tough one. Maybe "the area in front of the house with all the dirt and rocks"? This is why I like initialisms.

If it is uncultivated, a proviso in my original remarks, then it is, quite probably, a yard. It could be that the rocks are actually a carefully planted rock garden, in which case it is a garden.

Nothing ever happens on time - Soldier in 'Raye makhfi' ('Secret Ballot')
Show more