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The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish ... than a garden) and almost certainly paved, as Peter says.

And "a shrubbery" is a joke form Python, right? "A shrub" in AmE, anyway. "Shrubbery" in AmE is a mass noun, like "furniture" or "luggage", so it can't use an "a".

No, shrubbery is singular, you can have multiple shrubberies in one garden.

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"Shrubbery" in AmE is a mass noun, like "furniture" or "luggage", so it can't use an "a".

Same in BrE you can't have "a shrubbery" any more than you can have "a foliage" or, perhaps more aptly, "a plumage".

Not so. The OED gives the quote under definition 1 of shrubbery (A plantation of shrubs; a plot planted with shrubs); 'A beautiful shrubbery of birch, oak, and alders.' from T. Newte's Tour England & Scotland of 1791.

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one

That's a tough one. Maybe "the area in front of the house with all the dirt and rocks"? This is why I like initialisms.

If it is uncultivated, a proviso in my original remarks, then it is, quite probably, a yard. It could be that the rocks are actually a carefully planted rock garden, in which case it is a garden.

You seem to be confused by the difference between what something is, and what something is called. What it is, is dirt and rocks. What it is called in the US is a yard, and what it is called in some other countries is a garden. Neither term is correct or incorrect...only customary to the location and to the person applying the term.
"R F" wrote If it is uncultivated, a proviso in ... planted rock garden, in which case it is a garden.

You seem to be confused by the difference between what something is, and what something is called. What it is, ... is a garden. Neither term is correct or incorrect...only customary to the location and to the person applying the term.

Right. There is such a thing as a rock garden, but rest assured that mine was not that. Yes, my brother and I imported a lot of interesting river rocks to cover a particular area in front of the house and to place them also here and there around the rest of the spread there. We even built a walkway with the flat ones, and it included a couple of steps huge rectangular boulders. Yes, the front yard was slanted, and the walk led uphill from the curb to the front steps.
It was quite dramatic in appearance, but the next owner got rid of almost all of it. No class.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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And "a shrubbery" is a joke form Python, right? "A ... like "furniture" or "luggage", so it can't use an "a".

No, shrubbery is singular, you can have multiple shrubberies in one garden.

Not here, in AmE. They would be shrubs. If there were separate occurrences of the around the property, they would be mentioned as "there is shrubbery in several areas around the house". No shrubberies.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Same in BrE you can't have "a shrubbery" any more than you can have "a foliage" or, perhaps more aptly, "a plumage".

Not so. The OED gives the quote under definition 1 of shrubbery (A plantation of shrubs; a plot planted with shrubs); 'A beautiful shrubbery of birch, oak, and alders.' from T. Newte's Tour England & Scotland of 1791.

Which may suggest that it's archaic but it certainly isn't; loads of British country house owners still suggest "the shrubbery" when asked where Daphne and Charles might be found.
Matti
No, shrubbery is singular, you can have multiple shrubberies in one garden.

Not here, in AmE. They would be shrubs. If there were separate occurrences of the around the property, they would be mentioned as "there is shrubbery in several areas around the house". No shrubberies.

But a shrub and a shrubbery are different things! A shrubbery is an area devoted to, er, well, shrubs.
Matti
Not so. The OED gives the quote under definition 1 ... alders.' from T. Newte's Tour England & Scotland of 1791.

Which may suggest that it's archaic but it certainly isn't; loads of British country house owners still suggest "the shrubbery" when asked where Daphne and Charles might be found.

And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. There's a big difference between saying "a shrubbery" add "the shrubbery". Do I really have to explain it?
It's the same as the difference between "a luggage" and "the luggage", don't you see? It's your statements like the above one that diminish the effectivity of your arguments about the language in my eyes. Sorry.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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I find this use of "garden" peculiar. There are vegetable ... or more gardens, a lawn, some walkways, and a shrubbery.

The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish and attached to a house, it's a garden. Just a straggly lawn and a tired bit of privet? A garden., without a doubt.

If there were a subset of such a garden two meters square, hoed up and supporting the unnatural growth of rutabagas, tomatoes, chiles, artichokes and aubergines, how would you distinguish it from the rest of the garden? In speech, I mean.
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