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Not here, in AmE. They would be shrubs. If there ... is shrubbery in several areas around the house". No shrubberies.

But a shrub and a shrubbery are different things! A shrubbery is an area devoted to, er, well, shrubs.

True enough. And luggage is the concept devoted to a bunch of suitcases. Your point? Do you say "luggages"? My wife does, but she's a Filipina. She also refers to furnitures.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Which may suggest that it's archaic but it certainly ... shrubbery" when asked where Daphne and Charles might be found.

And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. There's a big difference between saying "a shrubbery" add "the shrubbery". Do I ... your statements like the above one that diminish the effectivity of your arguments about the language in my eyes. Sorry.

But, but, but ... It is totally normal English, to my ears, to say "you can't see the house from here because there's a shrubbery that gets in the way". No different from saying "a spinney", "a forest", or "a (UK) herbaceous border".

Or a description of a public garden might say that it includes a shrubbery with some interesting rare plants. Or even a shrubbery 100 ft by 50 ft.

If the respondent's idiolect (sorry, I've forgotten who it was) is similar to mine, then there is no call whatever to be rude about the effectivity (?) of his arguments about the language.
Katy
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The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish ... a tired bit of privet? A garden., without a doubt.

If there were a subset of such a garden two meters square, hoed up and supporting the unnatural growth of rutabagas, tomatoes, chiles, artichokes and aubergines, how would you distinguish it from the rest of the garden? In speech, I mean.

The vegetable garden. The garden can contain the herb garden, the lawn, the pond, the crazy paving, the gnomes . . . . The garden is the space, which may or may not contain other gardenin- related sub-areas.

(Another kind of "garden" is that found behind many pubs on the outskirts of cities, consisting of a few wooden benches and tables and perhaps, if you're lucky, a limp geranium in a hanging basket over the door to the toilets. Nobody, ever, would call it a "yard" if it's an outdoor space you go to sit in even if it's paved over and contains little more than stacked beer crates.)

Ross Howard
The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish ... a tired bit of privet? A garden., without a doubt.

If there were a subset of such a garden two meters square, hoed up and supporting the unnatural growth of rutabagas, tomatoes, chiles, artichokes and aubergines, how would you distinguish it from the rest of the garden? In speech, I mean.

That would be a vegetable patch. A similar thing supporting flowers would be a flower-bed. We would never refer to such a thing as a "garden" on its own.
Matti
But a shrub and a shrubbery are different things! A shrubbery is an area devoted to, er, well, shrubs.

True enough. And luggage is the concept devoted to a bunch of suitcases. Your point? Do you say "luggages"? My wife does, but she's a Filipina. She also refers to furnitures.

My point is that we use "a shrubbery", which you were saying above is not possible for you. But now you say "True enough" when I explain what a shrubbery is. Isn't this somewhat inconsistent?

No, I don't say "luggages" or "furnitures".
Matti
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And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. There's a big ... of your arguments about the language in my eyes. Sorry.

But, but, but ... It is totally normal English, to my ears, to say "you can't see the house from here because there's a shrubbery that gets in the way". No different from saying "a spinney", "a forest", or "a (UK) herbaceous border".

OK, I was going by AmE and what someone (I don't remember who it was) from the UK who supported the idea that "a shrubbery" is not possible in BrE. In AmE, it would be shrubbery that gets in the way, not a shrubbery. Just like you would take luggage on your trip and not *a* luggage.
Or a description of a public garden might say that it includes a shrubbery with some interesting rare plants. Or even a shrubbery 100 ft by 50 ft.

You mean, Monty Python was not joshing about the shrubberies? Damn! We Americans thought it was very funny.
OK, I'd like to buy a shrubbery, then. Right?
If the respondent's idiolect (sorry, I've forgotten who it was) is similar to mine, then there is no call whatever to be rude about the effectivity (?) of his arguments about the language.

OK, I suppose it is another one of the differences between AmE and BrE. If so, I'm offering Matti an apology. There are too many differences between our languages, and we all should indicate that in our responses. Matti and I are both guilty of not doing that.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Which may suggest that it's archaic but it certainly ... shrubbery" when asked where Daphne and Charles might be found.

And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. There's a big difference between saying "a shrubbery" add "the shrubbery". Do I really have to explain it?

No the trouble is that our mental images of "the shrubbery" are quite different; for you it can only be a mass noun, whilst for me it usually refers to an entity.
It's the same as the difference between "a luggage" and "the luggage", don't you see? It's your statements like the above one that diminish the effectivity of your arguments about the language in my eyes.Sorry.

You're right that it's the usage of "a shrubbery" or "shrubberies" which is at issue. Let me rephrase my example, then, by making the chap say "They're probably in one of the shrubberies." Thanks for pointing that out!
Matti
True enough. And luggage is the concept devoted to a ... does, but she's a Filipina. She also refers to furnitures.

My point is that we use "a shrubbery", which you were saying above is not possible for you. But now you say "True enough" when I explain what a shrubbery is. Isn't this somewhat inconsistent?

I thought UK people understood irony.
No, I don't say "luggages" or "furnitures".

Excellent!

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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In the interim, Katy has pointed out that this is definitely another one of the thenspondian differences. Damn, I had always thought that Monty Python was being extra funny about buying the shrubberies.

In view of that, I aplogize again for considering only the AmE way of life, much like you are considering only the BrE way. We both should be more explicit about what we are talking about.
Anyway, I'm sorry about my remarks the ones that could be considered to be derogatory.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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