1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
That would be a vegetable patch. A similar thing supporting flowers would be a flower-bed. We would never refer to such a thing as a "garden" on its own.

But you call a mere patch of grass a "garden"?
That would be a vegetable patch. A similar thing supporting ... to such a thing as a "garden" on its own.

But you call a mere patch of grass a "garden"?

A mere patch? Looxury! In our garden we 'ad three blades, and one o¡ them me da' had to keep upright with a Swan Vesta used as a splint.

Ross Howard
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
That would be a vegetable patch. A similar thing supporting ... to such a thing as a "garden" on its own.

But you call a mere patch of grass a "garden"?

Don't be silly. That's a "lawn". The garden is the container for the whole shebang. It may only contain a lawn, of course.

Matti
But you call a mere patch of grass a "garden"?

Don't be silly. That's a "lawn". The garden is the container for the whole shebang. It may only contain a lawn, of course.

Okay. I call a patch of grass a "lawn" too. If it's contained somehow, though, that isn't enough to make it a "garden" for me or a "yard" FTM.
Don't be silly. That's a "lawn". The garden is the container for the whole shebang. It may only contain a lawn, of course.

Okay. I call a patch of grass a "lawn" too. If it's contained somehow, though, that isn't enough to make it a "garden" for me or a "yard" FTM.

Hmm. You're being much too materialistic; the "garden" is a metaphysical concept whose boundaries need merely to be imaginable, not tangible. Just about any outdoor area in which Nature is permitted to operate will do.
And I should also have said that not all patches of grass are lawns. They have to be trimmed regularly to merit the appellation.

Matti
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
And I should also have said that not all patches of grass are lawns. They have to be trimmed regularly to merit the appellation.

I agree with that.
For me, "cemetery" is the ordinary working word, and "graveyard" is literary with a touch of the macabre. I would probably say

The cemetery across the street is mostly Irish Catholic.

but
Walking one night by a graveyard in Brooklyn, I saw a tombstone with my name on it.

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
I find this use of "garden" peculiar. There are vegetable gardens, flower gardens, rose gardens, even native plant gardens, but ... A yard adjacent to a house may contain one or more gardens, a lawn, some walkways, and a shrubbery.

And 'we' find the use of 'yard' for a lawned area just as strange, but it just depends which country you live in. Don't 'yard' and 'garden' have the same etymological root?

Rob Bannister
Try out our live chat room.
The Pond strikes again. In the UK, if it's greenish ... a tired bit of privet? A garden., without a doubt.

If there were a subset of such a garden two meters square, hoed up and supporting the unnatural growth of rutabagas, tomatoes, chiles, artichokes and aubergines, how would you distinguish it from the rest of the garden? In speech, I mean.

If it's that small, probably a vegetable patch. If larger, and particularly if separated from the rest of the garden by a fence, wall or hedge, then vegetable garden.

Rob Bannister
Show more