+0
Hi!
Can I start witing a formal letter with "Dear Mr. or Mrs."? Without any names, just the phrase in the quotation marks.
Can I start writing an informal letter to my aunt and my uncle with "Dear uncle, dear aunt" or maybe "Dear uncle and aunt"?
I you consider these greetings incorrect, can you suggest something instead?
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
Clive Hi,

I'm looking at all these responses and has everyone forgotten our friend in ambiguity "To Whom It May Concern"?

Other than for a general letter of reference for someone, are you seriously suggesting that people should write business letters starting with 'To Whom It May Concern'?

Please, please, please say you aren't advocating this.

Best wishes, Clive


I agree and the same goes for Dear Sir or Ma'am. In business it comes across as Dear Whatwasyournameagain?,

I own a business and if these headings come in with a resume, it is immediately discarded.
ermmm... can someone give me some formal greetings that i could use in a letter Emotion: big smile it would be awesome if u could
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Anonymousermmm... can someone give me some formal greetings that i could use in a letter it would be awesome if u could


Do your best to find out the name of the person. Call the company. Call the receptionist. Call that person's secretary/admin assistant.

Then write to that person.

Dear Ms. Anderson:

Dear Mr. Cooper:
Hi, Can I start writing a formal letter with "Dear Mr. or Mrs."? Without any names, just the phrase in the quotation marks. No, a more appropriate greeting would be one such as "Dear Sir or Madame:". It is considered more formal.

Can I start writing an informal letter to my aunt and my uncle with "Dear uncle, dear aunt" or maybe "Dear uncle and aunt"? Yes. It's okay, but not very courteous. A greeting with their names, "Dear Aunt __ and Uncle __". Even something as simple as "hello" could be used in an informal letter.

Hope this helps.