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Hi,

1) “When my sister got divorced, she went out of her way to make sure that things would go along in their usual grooves in terms of the upbringing of her child because she didn’t want to traumatize him.”

Could ‘go along in grooves’ be used this way?

2) What’s the difference between going on the ‘offensive and defensive’?

I know that the first one’s an attack on someone and the other’s used to ward off the attack, but judging by the examples I’ve come across so far, these two seem to overlap to some extent.

What do you think?

Thank you.

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Ann225Could ‘go along in grooves’ be used this way?

I've never seen or heard it used that way.

Ann225What do you think?

They are opposite strategies.

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1) I’m sorry, but that doesn’t exactly answer my question. Could it work or not? I’m refering to the question with ‘grooves’.

I came across it in an article, but I replaced ‘rumble along in its usual grooves’ with ‘go along’.

2) But I saw them used in the same situations.

“When I told him that he was having an affair, he immediately went on the offensive/defensive.”

Could you help me out here?

Thanks.

I also read on the Internet that ‘defensive’ and ‘offensive’ aren’t always opposites.
Ann225“When I told him that he was having an affair, he immediately went on the offensive/defensive.”

They are opposite strategies. in dealing with an adversarial situation.

Offensive - he accuses you of a worse infidelity
Defensive - he provides excuses for his behaviour.

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Ann225‘rumble along in its usual grooves’ with ‘go along’.

Your substitution does not work. It destroys the pictorial language of imagery.


A groove can be a set of ruts, left by many travellers from many previous journeys.
It forces the wheels onto that particular path, even if the driver has other intentions.

Does it mean that I can use it in my example? Thank you again. Emotion: smile

Ann225Does it mean that I can use it in my example?

I would not use "go" in place of "rumble."

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I meant ‘rumble’. Thank you. Emotion: smile