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What do all these mean ?

growing up, growing into, grown up with, grow up with

What is the right way to use them ?

Does this growing into mean getting better with something ?

"grow up with" is getting used to ?
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"The boy grew up" means "The boy got to be an adult".
"The girl grew up into a beautiful woman" means "The girl grew up and became a beautiful woman".
"He has grown up with computers" means "He has used computers since he was a kid".

paco
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growing up: A young creature (usually of humans) moving towards adulthood. 'He is growing up so fast' (often a parental complaint of loss of small cute malleable child!) ';He has a lot of growing up to do' (this person is immature).

growing into: to begin to fit into something that was too big for you. 'James is growing into that jumper grandma knitted for him'. It is sometimes used metaphorically 'Tom is growing into his role as manager at work.'So this sort of use does mean getting better at something - with the idea that the challenge was initially too much (too 'big') but he is gradually learning the skills and confidence (growing) to fit it.

grown up with, grow up with?: This means that something was around when you were a child so you are completely accustomed to it/attached to it.

'I've grown up with animals' means your family probably had a lot of pets or you lived on a farm. 'I've grown up with computers' is something a lot of people under 30 (ish) can say. 'I want my son to grow up with a sense of responsibility' (don't we all!)

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Comments  
growing up: A young creature (usually of humans) moving towards adulthood. 'He is growing up so fast' (often a parental complaint of loss of small cute malleable child!) ';He has a lot of growing up to do' (this person is immature).

growing into: to begin to fit into something that was too big for you. 'James is growing into that jumper grandma knitted for him'. It is sometimes used metaphorically 'Tom is growing into his role as manager at work.'So this sort of use does mean getting better at something - with the idea that the challenge was initially too much (too 'big') but he is gradually learning the skills and confidence (growing) to fit it.

grown up with, grow up with?: This means that something was around when you were a child so you are completely accustomed to it/attached to it.

'I've grown up with animals' means your family probably had a lot of pets or you lived on a farm. 'I've grown up with computers' is something a lot of people under 30 (ish) can say.

Another sense is that of: 'I want my son to grow up with a sense of responsibility' (don't we all!) This has a slightly different meaning to 'I want my son to grow up with siblings.' In the first case, the 'with' applies to something the child will have in itself, in the second the 'with' means alongside.

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