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However, Schoenfeld was perfectly well aware, and said in the ... perpetrated by a well known word processor distributed by ,

Yes, 'perpetrated' is correct, but the 'ise' ending was invented by British newspaper editors in the 1920s.

Not invented. The 'ise' ending must surely have existed before the 1920s. Many words with this ending must have entered English centuries ago via French, where all such words are spelt 'iser', and would have retained the 's'. What you may mean is that British editors tried to achieve uniformity in the chaos of inconsistent use of 'ise/ize' by declaring that 'ise' should be used for all words regardless of etymology.
Alan
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Alan Crozier
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Greetings.
My personal opinion is that 'beziehungsweise' mostly means 'and/or', and it would be very nice if English had a single word for that.

It's a problem of logic English does not distinguish between the inclusive and exclusive senses of "or". (I believe there are some languages that do, however something is telling me that Spanish is one of them, but I could be wrong.)
When speaking to computer scientists and programmers, you could replace "or" and "and/or" with "xor" and "or" and be perfectly understood. However, you then leave yourself wide open to snidely ambiguous answers such as "Yes, please!" to questions like, "Would you like the ham sandwich xor the cheese sandwich?"
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
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I read in sci.lang.translation that Alan Crozier
(Email Removed) wrote (in ) about 'Guide for German writers of English', on Wed, 25 Feb 2004:
Not invented. The 'ise' ending must surely have existed before the 1920s. Many words with this ending must have entered English centuries ago via French, where all such words are spelt 'iser', and would have retained the 's'.

In fact, there seem to be rather few of them that couldn't also plausibly have come direct from Latin.
What you may mean is that British editors tried to achieve uniformity in the chaos of inconsistent use of 'ise/ize' by declaring that 'ise' should be used for all words regardless of etymology.

You could put it that way, but 'invented' is correct where the '-ise' ending was newly put on a word that previously was always '-ize'.
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
The bad news is that everything is prohibited.
http://www.jmwa.demon.co.uk Also see http://www.isce.org.uk
Not invented. The 'ise' ending must surely have existed before ... words are spelt 'iser', and would have retained the 's'.

In fact, there seem to be rather few of them that couldn't also plausibly have come direct from Latin.

It's irrelevant whether or not it is plausible. The fact is that most of these words came to English language directly from the French language either because of the Norman conquest or because of the attraction France has always exerted on her neighbors. Although it is true that these words ultimately come from Latin, they came to English via the French language with a distictive French flavour.
Jan
That *is* the word: "and/or".

You appear to have missed the point. No-one I've met likes 'and/or', by the way.

True. Perhaps the simplest solution is "A, or B, or both".
Andy Taylor (Editor, Austrian Philatelic Society)
For Austrian philately http://www.kitzbuhel.demon.co.uk/austamps
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That *is* the word: "and/or".

You appear to have missed the point. No-one I've met likes 'and/or', by the way.

Needed a smiley. Sure no one likes it, but since there isn't any other alternative it's now so universal as to be almost a single word. Let's just drop the slash, and use "andor".
When speaking to computer scientists and programmers, you could replace "or" and "and/or" with "xor" and "or" and be perfectly ... snidely ambiguous answers such as "Yes, please!" to questions like, "Would you like the ham sandwich xor the cheese sandwich?"

Or you would get a "No, thanks!" if (s)he wanted both Emotion: smile

Peter
When speaking to computer scientists and programmers, you could replace ... "Would you like the ham sandwich xor the cheese sandwich?"

Or you would get a "No, thanks!" if (s)he wanted both Emotion: smile

In that case, I would say "No, please!"
(Please excuse the mail I sent, Peter - I inadvertently pressed the "Re: Mail" button)
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