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Greetings.
"
Then you write >Unlike in German, there is no space around a slash.`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
Greetings.
Section 1.2 of this document states "Double quotation marks ... always come in pairs", but I believe there is an exception from this rule when a quotation spans several paragraphs.

Correct you are. It didn't occur to me to mention this as it's rare in scientific papers to quote more than a sentence or two in quotation marks. Longer quotations are usually set in indented paragraphs, without quotation marks.
Section 1.3 says "Unlike in German, there is no space around a slash." That's just as in German - at ... "a cat and / or a dog"; and it is incorrect to spell "eine Katze und / oder einen Hund".

Ah... as I mentioned in another post, I had assumed Germans put space around slashes since so many of my colleagues do this.
I wonder why the section on the ampersand is included there. Apparently, the only difference is that you must not use the ampersand in German except as a part of a company name.

Perhaps it's not a mistake specific to German speakers, but it does crop up quite often in my proofreading. Perhaps Germans mistakenly think that the English predeliction for Latin abbreviation extends to the ampersand, which is actually a fancy "et" ligature.
In section 1.5 on the ellipsis I am missing some hint on when to place space around it.

To be honest, I don't know the standard practice myself, or even if there is one. Anyone?
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Greetings.
It looks good from a quick glance. However, I think you are a bit dogmatic on some points. That's OK if this manual is intended to achieve a uniform style within one company, but there is a great deal of variation in the real world.

Ah... I had considered adding an introduction stating that the article was simply meant as a general guide to what one commonly sees, and that one should always consult one's publisher's style sheet to see how they want things formatted. Since you picked up on this I will go ahead and write that introduction.
In Britain, for example, the em-dash is often replaced by an en-dash with a space on either side.

I have noticed this sometimes, but never in a professionally typeset publication. Can you think of a major newspaper or publisher that uses the en-dash with spacing in this manner? Or perhaps a popular style guide which advocates this usage? If so I'll mention this variation as well in my article.
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
I work in a German research centre, and as one ... punctuation and diction.. The PDF version is available here: http://www.dfki.uni-kl.de/~miller/publications/advice.pdf

Interesting list, thank you. Parts of your list could have been written for me . Two short notes, the first ... mark. In German, if there is a comma, it would be the other way round. See the middle line below.

This question is frequently discussed in a.u.e. and appears in the a.u.e. FAQ. The method that you describe for German is common in Britain. The U.S. standard is that the combinations ", and ". never occur (except in technical publications in such fields as linguistics and computer programming). So the comma goes before the quotation mark. However, a noticeable minority of Americans, including me, don't put punctuation inside the quotation marks unless it's part of the quotation.
Then you write >Unlike in German, there is no space around a slash.< Hmm, is there one in German? If ... möchte eine Katze und/oder einen Hund". (PS: I read europa.linguas but not a.u.e, and I do not want a pet.)[/nq]
Cross-posting restored.

Jerry Friedman
BTW, for the first example on the last page of ... want to go to the first or second floor, respectively.

Yes, this is permissible albeit pedantic. The correspondence between "1" and "first", and between "2" and "second", is strong enough ... "respectively" in this context only in the odd case where button 1 took you to floor 2 and vice versa.

Which leads to another minor issue: in Britain the level at which you enter a (traditionally-designed) building is the ground floor; in USA the first. (Except for hotels in UK seeking to attract American tourists!)
What's the convention in Germany for numbering floors?
Andy Taylor (Editor, Austrian Philatelic Society)
For Austrian philately http://www.kitzbuhel.demon.co.uk/austamps
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Referring to section 1.6, I reckon 640x480 is correct, but you have it both correct and incorrect.
Curiously, 480x640 grates. Which raises the wooden subject of two-by-fours (in AmE) v four-by-twos (in BrE).

Mike Connally Reading, England
Perhaps it's not a mistake specific to German speakers, but it does crop up quite often in my proofreading.

OK, since we're on the topic of spaces, punctuation and proof-reading...what's the deal with double-spaces after periods, question marks and exclamation marks?
Greetings.
Which leads to another minor issue: in Britain the level at which you enter a (traditionally-designed) building is the ground floor; in USA the first. (Except for hotels in UK seeking to attract American tourists!) What's the convention in Germany for numbering floors?

I think the ground floor/first floor distinction is common everywhere outside North America. However, you'd never guess it by examining my building, where the front entrance is on the second floor, which also happens to be the ground floor. Strangely, the first floor is also a ground floor, as it has a little-used exit at the back. We have no ground floor named as such in the building, nor do we have a basement.

Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
In section 1.5 on the ellipsis I am missing some hint on when to place space around it.

To be honest, I don't know the standard practice myself, or even if there is one. Anyone?

The following is quoted from
F. Crews, /The Random House Handbook/ (New York: Random House, 1987)

27c Learn How to Form the Three Kinds of Ellipses.
1. An ellipsis (20n, p. 385) is formed with three spaced dots if it signifies the omission of material within a quoted sentence. Note that a space is left before and after the whole ellipsis as well as after each dot:

"The government," she said, "appears to be abandoning its . . . efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation."
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