1 2 3 4  6 7 8 17
Most English speakers would use "respectively" in this context only in the odd case where button 1 took you to floor 2 and vice versa.

Well, this explains it.

the abbreviation "resp." is not used in English.

resp. /abbrev. for:/ 1. respective(ly). 2. respondent.

I'm quite aware of the fact that dictionaries don't reflect the actual language. At least, "resp." doesn't appear to be ... "respectively" does not actually translate "beziehungsweise". "Respectively" literally means "je nachdem" while "bzw." most often translates into a simple "or".

The key thing is that "respectively" isn't the usual translation for "bzw." - and even where it is the appropriate translation the usage is different, i.e. "... and ..., respectively".
It isn't usual in modern usage to abbreviate the word "respectively", and I'm not sure that it ever was in this particular context.

Gruß, einde O'Callaghan (posting from a.u.g.)
The PDF version is available here: http://www.dfki.uni-kl.de/~miller/publications/advice.pdf

Ah, sehr interessant und lehrreich.
Ich meine aber, da=DF einige Ihrer Beispiele aus dem Deutschen nicht=20 stimmen:
"Unlike in German, there is no space around a slash." "I want a cat and / or a dog."
Da sind die Leerzeichen auch im Deutschen falsch, auch wenn sie oft=20 gesetzt werden. Also nicht "und / oder", sondern "und/oder".

"z. B.", "a. a.O.", "d. h." sind auch falsch, wiederum bitte ohne=20 Leerzeichen: "z.B.", "a.a.O.", "d.h.". Ich wei=DF, da=DF das oft falsch=20 gemacht wird, aber dennoch ist es - falsch.
"Sie k=F6nnen uns anrufen bzw. unter der folgenden Adresse postalisch=20 erreichen." Das ist furchtbares Holperdeutsch. "Sie k=F6nnen uns anrufen=20 oder uns unter der folgenden Adresse per Post erreichen." (Auch kein=20 Meisterwerk, aber doch ein bi=DFchen besser.)
Weiterhin viel Vergn=FCgen
Klaas B=E4hre
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
OK, since we're on the topic of spaces, punctuation and proof-reading...what's the deal with double-spaces after periods, question marks and exclamation marks?

Don't.

I don't, but many Americans do. I find this extremely annoying.
(Re: "resp.")
Are there? I have never seen or heard it used in my life. I do not believe that it is a part of normal spoken or written English in any context.

It may be a term of art in some profession or other, I suppose, but I agree that it is not "normal" English, nor have I ever seen it used except perhaps as part of some sort of informal shorthand.

Michael West
"z. B.", "a. a.O.", "d. h." sind auch falsch, wiederum bitte ohne Leerzeichen: "z.B.", "a.a.O.", "d.h.". Ich weiß, daß das oft falsch gemacht wird, aber dennoch ist es - falsch.

Quote from the "Richtlinien fuer den Schriftsatz" in the Duden (identical in both the traditional edition (1991) and the official school spelling (1996)):
Bei mehrgliedrigen Abkuerzungen wird zwischen den einzelnen Gliedern nach dem Punkt ein kleiner Zwischenraum gesetzt. z. B., u. v. a. m., i. V., u. dgl. m.

This roughly translates into: "Parts of a multielement abbreviation are separated by a thin space following the dot."
This rule is nearly always obeyed in professional German typesetting. Of course you also find English-styled character clusters and any kind of abuse from amateurs.
Gerd
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I intend to make this document freely available to the public. However before I add a prominent link to it ... have a look over it and offer any suggestions for additions or changes. The PDF version is available here: http://www.dfki.uni-kl.de/~miller/publications/advice.pdf

Paragraph 3.1, line 2, abbreviations is spelled wrong.
Louisa
Essex, England, Europe
Hmmm... so many of my colleagues put space around slashes that I figured it must be standard in German. If that's not the case, I'll have to ask them who taught them that.

As far as I know it's not. I don't leave any space usually.

patrick

(de), (en), (es)
Don't.

I don't, but many Americans do. I find this extremely annoying.

What does Candian French do ?
Does it have the space before ? like the French,
or do they conform to the English convention?
Jan
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hmmm... so many of my colleagues put space around slashes that I figuredit must be standard in German. If that's not the case, I'll have to ask them who taught them that.

So do many English speakers. I assume it is simply because they think it looks better, which it does.
Dave
Show more