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Greetings.
The PDF version is available here: http://www.dfki.uni-kl.de/~miller/publications/advice.pdf

Ah, sehr interessant und lehrreich.

Please don't post the same message multiple times in different newsgroups; it breaks threading and makes it difficult to track replies. Try using the cross-posting feature of your newsreader.
(I'm referring to message (Email Removed), which is a duplicate of this one posted to sci.lang.translation.)

Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
Like French, for example ?

Je ne sais pas. The typical troubles that occur are that double-spaces at the end of a line appear in ... appear on a line of its own - I have even seen it print on a page of its own!

But not in professionally typeset French text. The space between "?", "!", ":", "«", and "»" and the word after which they stand (of course, "«" stands before words) is the "espace fine insécable" which is not as wide as a normal space character and also is no-break.

- Sebastian
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Tristan Miller schrieb:
I intend to make this document freely available to the public. However before I add a prominent link to it ... be grateful if interested parties here could have a look over it and offer any suggestions for additions or changes.

Starting a letter with "Dear Ladies and Gentlemen" instead of "Dear Sirs".

JL
Stefan Heinzmann schrieb:
Another worthwile addition would be it's vs. its

From what I've seen up to now, this is a mistake made primarily by native speakers, just like your->you're.
JL
Stefan Heinzmann schrieb:

Another worthwile addition would be it's vs. its

From what I've seen up to now, this is a mistake made primarily by native speakers, just like your->you're.

You'll laugh; since I've moved from Colorado to Texas, I keep catching myself typing "A" when I mean "I". A jus' kint help it.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Stefan Heinzmann schrieb: From what I've seen up to now, this is a mistake made primarily by native speakers, just like your->you're.

You'll laugh; since I've moved from Colorado to Texas, I keep catching myself typing "A" when I mean "I". A jus' kint help it.

Do Texans really use the "Ah" sound for "I"?
Where I come from (Mississippi), a distinctly different sound is used for long "i." This can be demonstrated by asking someone to pronounce the phrase "Father Time." The vowel sounds are not the same.

Exception: In my mother's father's accent, you couldn't hear the difference between "far" and "fire."

Tim Kynerd Sundbyberg (småstan i storstan), Sweden (Email Removed) Sunrise in Stockholm today: 7:34
Sunset in Stockholm today: 16:28
My rail transit photos at http://www.kynerd.nu
You'll laugh; since I've moved from Colorado to Texas, I keep catching myself typing "A" when I mean "I". A jus' kint help it.

Do Texans really use the "Ah" sound for "I"? Where I come from (Mississippi), a distinctly different sound is used ... sounds are not the same. Exception: In my mother's father's accent, you couldn't hear the difference between "far" and "fire."

There are several different 'Texas' accents. In high school I read an article giving the history of the different settlers, and it came up with reasonable arguments that there are actually at least five different regions in the state. It didn't talk about accents in particular, but that would be an interesting discussion too.

In particular: I have met a few people from deep in the piney woods of East Texas, who pronounced "tire" so that it rhymed with "tar". But that's not true everywhere.

Steve M - (Email Removed) (remove dirt for reply)

"Facts do not cease to exist simply because they are ignored." Aldous Huxley
Do Texans really use the "Ah" sound for "I"?

Well, this is east Texas, close to the Louisiana state line, i.e. Cajun country. Also, about 50% of the town's population is black. The request "Ah gots to git mah arl chaynged." wouldn't startle the local car mechanics very much.
Exception: In my mother's father's accent, you couldn't hear the difference between "far" and "fire."

Well, we got us a fart pawtmint, too :-)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In particular: I have met a few people from deep in the piney woodsof East Texas, who pronounced "tire" so that it rhymed with "tar".But that's not true everywhere.

Exactly. I can give you the number for the tire shop at the end of the block, and the phone will be answered with "Expat Tar, how kinna help you?"
René, behind the Piney Curtain.
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