1 5 6 7  9 10 11 17
In particular: I have met a few people from deep ... that it rhymed with "tar". But that's not true everywhere.

Exactly. I can give you the number for the tire shop at the end of the block, and the phone will be answered with "Expat Tar, how kinna help you?"

Wouldn't that be "hep you"?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Wouldn't that be "hep you"?

Caught me. You're right, but my fingers refused to type it.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In my native Missouri Ozarks they also say "Ah" for "I", "far" for "fire","tar" for "tire" (and sometimes for "tower") "rang" and "thang" for "ring" and "thing", "caint" for "can't", etc. Obviously that is not everyone, but is true of "native speakers" of the old time dialect.

But a lot of Ozark dialect is pure Shakespearean. I have put a good article online at http://roy.w.johnson.home.att.net/ozark.hem which discusses the Elizabethan origins of Ozarkese. I suspect the same antecedents could be found in other pockets of America, particularly Appalachia and parts of the south.
This article, unfortunately, doesn't preserve the above pronunciations. I have heard them all and I can guarantee that they are accurate. I taught history and speech in an Ozark school and I was explaining that everyone, everywhere, has some kind of accent. Even "standard English" depends on which standard British or American, etc., and in the US is usually similar to "cultured Midwestern" (Ohio), I explained. One young man raised his hand.
"Mr. Johnson," he said, "Ah don't thank ah got an acceyent (yes, three syllables in "accent").

Roy Johnson
Researching Schnake/Schnacke of Kreis Minden and worldwide SchnakeNet home page http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~schnake
In particular: I have met a few people from deep ... that it rhymed with "tar". But that's not true everywhere.

Exactly. I can give you the number for the tire shop at the end of the block, and the phone will be answered with "Expat Tar, how kinna help you?" René, behind the Piney Curtain.

Better yet, "How kinna hep y'all?"

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
M A L E D I C T A
P.O. Box 14123
Santa Rosa, CA 95402, USA
http://www.sonic.net/maledicta /
Greetings. I work in a German research centre, and as ... "bzw.", plus differences between German and English punctuation and diction.

It looks good from a quick glance. However, I think you are a bit dogmatic on some points. That's OK ... an en-dash with a space on either side. And I don't think many publishers recommend italics for e.g., i.e., cf.

Moreover, I am most certainly not used to seeing a comma after eg and ie. I was curious as to why you did not write this in German, since you are addressing Germans.
A much more common error - in my experience at least - is the misuse of the Present Continuous and Simple Present and also the tense used in sentences like "Ich bin hier schon seit einer Stunde".
Rob Bannister
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Then you write >Unlike in German, there is no space ... dog", I write "Ich möchte eine Katze und/oder einen Hund".

Hmmm... so many of my colleagues put space around slashes that I figured it must be standard in German. If that's not the case, I'll have to ask them who taught them that.

I put spaces around slashes occasionally to avoid unaesthetically pleasing line breaks. Of course, proper proof-reading and manual changes are better.

Rob Bannister
Well, of course that's http://roy.w.johnson.home.att.net/ozark.htm sorry for the typo

Roy Johnson
Researching Schnake/Schnacke of Kreis Minden and worldwide SchnakeNet home page http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~schnake
A much more common error - in my experience at least - is the misuse of the Present Continuous and Simple Present and also the tense used in sentences like "Ich bin hier schon seit einer Stunde".

Not to mention the awkward word order of the German sentence. Correct: "Ich bin schon seit einer Stunde hier".

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
}
}
}
}> A much more common error - in my experience at least - is the misuse of }> the Present Continuous and Simple Present and also the tense used in }> sentences like "Ich bin hier schon seit einer Stunde". }
} Not to mention the awkward word order of the German sentence. } Correct: "Ich bin schon seit einer Stunde hier".

Correcter: "Ich bin schon seit einer Stunde hier auszuschimpfen."

R. J. Valentine In America, at least. To real editors, at least.
Show more