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Hi,

could you help me solve this puzzle, please?

There is this gap filling exercise. One, two, or all three answers may be correct. In this sentece, the correct answer is B. I think, however, A is also possible. I've been racking my brains over it and I can't see exactly why not. C is not correct, that is clear, as we do not use „would“ for states in the past but only for activities.

Before she got married she _______________ in Germany for two years.

a) used to live b) lived c) would live

There is a similar (in my opinion) sentence in this exercise. Here, A and C are correct answers, and I agree.

Before my brother had children he ____________ a motorbike.

a) used to have b) would have c) had

Thank you for your thoughts on this subject.

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radovanBefore she got married she _______________ in Germany for two years.

lived

In a biography, looking back at the past history of a person, "would live" is possible. However, it is very uncommon.

radovanBefore my brother had children he ____________ a motorbike.

had

"used to" is not used with "before" in the same clause.


My brother used to have a motorbike, but that was before he had children. His wife made him settle down and that meant selling his youthful toys.
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radovanBefore she got married she _______________ in Germany for two years.
a) used to live b) lived c) would live

a); b)

Oddly enough, if it were "after", c) would work with a meaning similar to "was going to".

After she got married she [would live / was (going) to live] in Germany for two years.

But that doesn't fall into the category announced by your header "Habits in the Past".

radovanBefore my brother had children he ____________ a motorbike.
a) used to have b) would have c) had

a); c)

CJ

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Comments  
AlpheccaStars"used to" is not used with "before" in the same clause.

The solutions I presented are the solutions from the textbook. So it seems, it is not the sentence with the girl from Germany where they have a mistake in the key, but the sentence with the brother. If "used to" is not used with "before" in the same sentence (thanks for telling me this rule) then it rules out "used to" in both of them. Have I got it right? But why the example

AlpheccaStarsMy brother used to have a motorbike, but that was before he had children. His wife made him settle down and that meant selling his youthful toys.

at the end? I am a bit confused Alphecca Emotion: smile

radovanat the end? I am a bit confused Alphecca

I just gave you a natural English example.

My brother used to have a motorbike, (Main clause)

but that was before he had children (another separate main clause.)

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJimBut that doesn't fall into the category announced by your header "Habits in the Past".

Thanks CJ. I can't see this specific example exctly as habitual behaviour myself. However, the grammar of the lesson is called "Talking about habitual acitons". For the present: "will", "usually (ond other frequency adverbs) + present simple", and for annoying habits stressed "will", and "is constantly/forever +ing verb". For the past: "used to", "would" and for annoying habits stressed "would", "were/was always +int verb". Maturita Solutions Advanced 1st edition, by Oxford Publishing. So it is slightly confusing.

radovanI can't see this specific example exactly as habitual behaviour myself.

I hope you understand that it was my own sentence, where I changed 'before' to 'after', that did not express a past habit. I thought the same sentence with 'before', as originally written, did seem to fit in the context of past habits, so I had no objection to that one.

CJ

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