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Can I say this to a friend who didn't come home until early in the morning?

Had a late night last night?

Thank you.
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Hi,

The above sounds like you already know.

If you know, why are you asking?Emotion: smile

(Did you) have a late night last night?

Clive
Hi Clive,

So should it be: Have a late night last night?

I don't know that's why I'm asking. I'm unsure if it's okay or not...
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Hi,

So should it be: Have a late night last night? Yes.

Clive
Had a late night last night?-- I beg to disagree. This can be considered a simple, if casual, inquiry, just as can 'Have a late night last night?' Their intents are precisely the same; the verb tenses reflect only the speaker's perceived vantage point.
Pardon me. I was inattentive. The two forms are shortened forms of these:

Had a late night last night? = You had a late night last night?

Have a late night last night? = Did you have a late night last night?

They are different forms of the same question. The first form is gaining immense popularity in AmE at least: Want another drink? Seen the movie at the Odeon? Been to church this month?
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Mister MicawberThey are different forms of the same question. The first form is gaining immense popularity in AmE at least: Want another drink? Seen the movie at the Odeon? Been to church this month?
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Hi,

You could also not worry about a verb at all, and just say 'Late night last night?'

Clive