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The rebels and monitors held emergency talks in the wake of a sea battle which the government says left dozens dead.

After the incident, the monitors blamed the Tigers for provoking the navy, saying it was "very clear that the Sea Tigers have no rights at sea".

Rebel official SP Thamilselvan said the Tigers had asked the monitors to explain their statement.

The government says 17 troops and more than 40 rebels died in a Tiger suicide sea attack near Jaffna on Thursday. The Tigers say the navy attacked them and say only four of their members were killed.
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Tigers had asked the monitors to explain their statement.
Is it necessary to write the past perfect here? I would write the simple past here. [ Tigers asked the monitors to explain their ...]

1. They may have had a meeting with the monitors around 10 o' clock in the morning.
2. Thamilselvan may have told the reporters about this around 2o' clock in the evening of the day.

So there is a time gap. I am not sure this lapse of time automatically qualifies to write the past perfect tense.

I would like to hear your comments.
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Comments  
Hi Rotter,

Yes, you could use simple past here. The sequence of events would still be clear. The use of the Past Perfect just makes the sequence more emphatic.


You wrote: So there is a time gap. I am not sure this lapse of time automatically qualifies to write the past perfect tense.

The use of Past Perfect does not depend on the amount of time that has passed. It just relates to clarification of sequence. Consider: The soldier stopped suddenly. A bullet had hit his shoulder.

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks Clive for the reply.

I have learnt the basic necessity for writing the past perfect tense is 'one past event before another past event'.

1. A couple of days ago I visited a shop.

2. I bought a mobile hard drive becaue I was lured by the price tag.

3. Afterwards, I came home and posted a question on this to this forum.

4. I had posted a question to know about the way the native speakers use the word 'seduce'

Is the fourth sentence fine?
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Hi again,

I have learnt the basic necessity for writing the past perfect tense is 'one past event before another past event'. That's true, but there is a bit more to it than that. After all, almost every time you talk about two different events in the past, one will be before the other. Yet you don;t always have to use the past perfect every time.


1. A couple of days ago I visited a shop.

2. I bought a mobile hard drive becaue I was lured by the price tag.

3. Afterwards, I came home and posted a question on this to this forum.

4. I had posted a question to know about the way the native speakers use the word 'seduce'

Is the fourth sentence fine? What I understand you are telling me in #4 is that sometime before #3, and maybe also even before #2and #1, you posted another question. Is that what you mean?


Best wishes, Clive
No Clive, you misunderstood me.

In my first 3 senteces, I am telling you the entire episode.

1. First I visited a shop.

2. I bought a mobile drive.

3. Finally I came home and posted a question to know about the word 'seduce'. They seduce me into buying the mobile hard drive.

So the context is clear to you.

Would you write the fourth sentence?
4. I had posted a question to know about the way the native speakers use the word 'seduce'.


Hi,

Let's look at a bit more explanation, and then a simple example.

You speak of a time in the past. eg yesterday afternoon.

Now you speak of a time before that, eg yesterday morning. The reason you do this is because something that happened yesterday morning had 'importance' yesterday afternoon. eg

It rained yesterday afternoon.

I had put my umbrella in my backpack. [. . . so I didn't get wet . . .]

Do you have any questions about this explanation or example?

Best wishes, Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yes, the insertion of an umbrella into your backpack took place before rain.
So today you could say 'I had put my umbrella in my backpack'.
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1. You left home walking around the forest around 11 o' clock.

2. It rained yesterday afternoon around 1 o' clock.

3 You had wore a macintosh as you knew it would rain. [ Could I write this?]
Hi again,

Yes, the insertion of an umbrella into your backpack took place before rain.
So today you could say 'I had put my umbrella in my backpack'. Yes. But first, you need to say 'It started to rain'.
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1. You left home walking around the forest around 11 o' clock.

2. It rained yesterday afternoon around 1 o' clock.

3 You had worn a macintosh as you knew it would rain. [ Could I write this?] Yes. You could also say You had
worn a macintosh as you had known it would rain.

Best wishes, Clive
Putting the umbrella into the backpack is the oldest event.

Why do you want to say 'it rains yesterday afternoon' first?

I thought the past tense of the word 'wear' is wore.

My dictionary says both wore and worn.
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