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Is this chain exercise using "had better" correct, please?

I guess they'd better wait for an answer within some minutes
I guess they'd better sleep within some minutes.
I guess they'd better sleep right now.
I guess they'd better tell the truth right now.
I guess they'd better tell the truth soon.
I guess they'd better solve the problem soon.
I guess they'd better solve the problem as soon as possible.
I guess they'd better solve the problem now.

Thanks for the attention,
Anon.
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Anonymous Is this chain exercise using "had better" correct, please?

I guess they'd better wait for an answer within some minutes
I guess they'd better sleep within some minutes.
I guess they'd better sleep right now.
I guess they'd better tell the truth right now.
I guess they'd better tell the truth soon.
I guess they'd better solve the problem soon.
I guess they'd better solve the problem as soon as possible.
I guess they'd better solve the problem now.

Thanks for the attention,
Anon.

Fine.
To me, the first three sentences are not natural. I'd suggest these changes:

- I guess they'd better wait a few minutes for an answer within some minutes.
- I guess they'd better go to sleep within some a few / the next few minutes.
- I guess they'd better go to sleep right now.
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Hi Yankee,

Thanks for the corrections. But as it is a chain drill exercise in which I have to repeat the words so can I say those first three sentences as follows?

I guess they'd better wait for an answer within a few minutes.
I guess they'd better go to sleep within a few minutes.
I guess they'd better go to sleep right now.
.
.
.

Thanks again,
Anon.
Hi Anon

To me the first sentence is simply wrong. Period.

What is the goal of this "chain drill exercise"? Is it supposed to teach students how to use English incorrectly? Using sentence 1 would in essence drill a usage error into a learner's head. It is counter-productive to drill "had better" if doing so reinforces other errors.

I'd say sentence 2 is more likely to be expressed as "within the next few minutes".
Hi Yankee,

First of all let me tell you that I'm just a student, not a teacher. Considering it, commit mistakes is something considered acceptable, mainly because I'm not native.
So, I may say there's nothing wrong with the exercise,the problem is that the sentences I made were wrong. My intention when I sent you those first three sentences was just to know if there was another alternative because in the required exercise parts of a sentence should be repeated making a chain. But as now I know it's not possible because it's completely wrong, so this is what I'll use following your answers:

I guess they'd better wait a few minutes for an answer;
I guess they'd better go to sleep a few minutes;
I guess they'd better go to sleep right now.

Okay? I'm very sorry to let you so angry.
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Hi Anon
AnonymousOkay? I'm very sorry to get you so angry.
I wasn't angry. I was simply being very definite. Emotion: wink

I'm familiar with this sort of chain drill. However, I'd say it can actually become much harder to create natural sentences if too many of the elements of the sentences have to remain exactly the same. You often end up with quite a few sentences that sound forced or awkward, or that are just plain wrong -- which is apparently what has now happened to your latest batch of sentences. What is the intended meaning of sentence 2? Are they supposed to start sleeping very soon (sometime within the next 5 minutes)? Or are they supposed to go to sleep immediately, sleep for about 5 minutes, and then wake up again?
AnonymousI guess they'd better wait (for) a few minutes for an answer;
I guess they'd better go to sleep in ?? a few minutes;
I guess they'd better go to sleep right now.
In the first sentence, the preposition "for" is optional.

In sentence 2, the preposition "in" is necessary if you want to convey the idea of "soon". If for some strange reason you want to say that it is very important that they spend a few minutes sleeping, then it would be better to use the preposition "for" rather than simply omitting it.
Hi Yankee

Good to know that I didn't get you angry. By the way when can we use let? Concerning sentence nº 2 sorry, but I just wrote exactly what you had written in blue. In fact I was in doubt if I should consider within or not before your suggestion a few/the next few. So, I decided to omit it.

- I guess they'd better go to sleep within some a few / the next few minutes.
AnonymousBy the way when can we use let?
If that was actually a serious question, then I would ask you to please be more specific. The word "let" has quite a few definitions and usages, and I feel sure you already know some of them. Perhaps you will find what you're looking for here, for example: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.asp?dict=B&searchword=let
Yankee- I guess they'd better go to sleep within some a few / the next few minutes.
Anonymous- I guess they'd better go to sleep within some a few / the next few minutes.
In that particular sentence, I suggested adding "go to", and then I suggested replacing the word "some" with either "a few" or "the next few". That's why I crossed out the word "some" in my post. (I'm not quite sure why "some" was not crossed out in your post.) I did not cross out or eliminate the word "within" in that sentence.
AnonymousI guess they'd better wait (for) a few minutes for an answer.
Do you understand why I changed the word order and also removed the word "within" from the sentence with the verb "wait"?
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