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If I want to make this a standard form, how?
1. I could have made half a grand if they had got it in stock. (I heard 'had got' is in the present tense? How so? I have to use 'had had got' to make it one of the standard conditionals? I don't understand that. For #2, I don't have to use 'had had bought'?

Like this standard:
2. I could have made half a grand if they had bought it.

'I could have made half a grand, if they had got it in stock.'

In summary, you need [IF + past perfect of 'have got'] + 'could have made'. But 'have got' has no past perfect. So you have to use the past perfect of 'have'.

What do you mean by 'have got' has not past perfect? For eg. 'have bought' =present perfect and the past perfect is 'had bought', so what's wrong with 'had got'? I don't see it, why isn't it past perfect?)

Thanks.
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Comments  
"had got" means, recieve, obtain, come into possession:

If you had got(ten) my call. . .
If you had got(ten) your cold from skiing the other day . . . .
If you had got(ten) that car from my dealer . . . .

? If they had got(ten) it in stock. . . .
If they had had it in stock. . . .
Can you also say:
"Had they had it in stock"?
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So this is correct?

1. I could have made half a grand if they had got it in stock.

If #1 is correct, what about the stuff below?
1. 'I have got' is a special verb: it's a present perfect form with a present meaning. So for the equivalent of the simple past for 'they have got', you have to say 'they had got'. But that leaves no form for the equivalent of the past perfect. Think of it like this:

they have got = present tense
they had got = simple past

So how do we form the past perfect? Some people might say:

?they had had got = past perfect


they have got = present tense
they had got = simple past


How come:
2. They have got... (This isn't present perfect?)
3. They had got...(This isn't past perfect?)

Then how is:
4. They have killed.. (This is present perfect? It isn't present tense right? So how is #2 not present perfect?)
5. They had killed... (This is past perfect right? How is #3 not past perfect?)
Who said "they have got = present tense" ?
Who said "they had got = simple past " ?
"Have got" is ALWAYS in present perfect and "Had got" is ALWAYS in past perfect tense, simply as that, no matter how the pseudo logic goes.

Do not fool around with the idea that "'I have got' is a special verb: it's a present perfect form with a present meaning" and then eventually modify it into weird forms such as "I had had got". This form just doesn't exist.
In my dialect, Pieanne, Yes. If it's a conditional,

Had they had it in stock, they would have . . . .
If they had it in stock, they would have. . . .
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OF COURSE!
Thanks, Mr (?) Casi! Emotion: smile
Hi!
I´ve read your message and it seems very interesting to me, but i still have a doubt. Could you please tell me if the following sentence is correct?

If she had got a car, she could travel more often. (being this one the conditional for: She hasn´t got a car. She can´t travel very often)

My logic says it is correct but i´ve never seen it written before and i´ve been told it is wrong.
Could you please help me? It´s really important as I have to explain it in a class.
Thanks a lot!
If she had a car, she could travel more often.

The "had got" form is so seldom used, it's hardly worth agonizing over it.

"have got" is used as an idiom for the simpler "have". That means it's allowed to break the rules! The idiom "have got" does not go easily into other tenses. (In this way it is similar to the expressions "I had better" and "I would rather", which don't change tense either.) Only rarely is it used in the past. In general it would best to treat it as we treat "must": In the present, say "must": "He must leave now". To form the past, change "must" to the equivalent "have to" and put that in the past: "He had to leave then." (Because there is no "musted".) Likewise "She has got a car" (meaning "She has a car") should be expressed as "She had a car" in the past. You can force the issue and say "She had got a car", but you'll find that people don't say it that way very often at all.

CJ
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