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Hello

I would like to hear from our native English speakers about the words 'had had' in the following.
Just after you wake up, you could say I have had a comfortable night/sleep.

1. She said she had a comfortable night/sleep.

2. She said she had had ....... [ is this form correct?]
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Lady Thatcher was treated in a separate room for "security reasons", but was treated as an NHS patient, he added.
Earlier Mark Purcell, spokesman for the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, said the former prime minister had had a comfortable night.
Former Thatcher adviser Lord Bell said Lady Thatcher had been keen to go home and had begun to be "difficult".
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thanks pienne for the reply.

The following is what Clive has written:

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Later, you meet another person and you say 'Clive told me he had had an interview'. Here, it's clear to the speaker that the interview was before Clive told you about it.
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This event took place in the past.

1. I met him a couple of days ago.

2. He visited South Africa nearly 3 weeks ago.

So if you compare with what Clive has written, the second sentence sounds fine. Today I am talkintg about two past events; so it is clear to everybody about the sequence of the events.
Rex, which second sentence are you referring to?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I am referring to the following sentence.

2] Tim said he had had seen lions in the African jungles.
OK. Now, in Clive's sentence <"Clive told me he had had an interview'.>, the main verb is "have", conjugated in the past perfect = auxiliary "have" in the simple past (=had), + past participle of the main verb have = "had".

In the "had had seen" sentence, your main verb is "see". It should be conjugated in the past perfect, so we have "had" + main verb in the past participle = seen.

There is no tense that doubles the auxiliary ("had had + main verb"), it simply doesn't exist...
Thanks pienne.
I got your point.
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Thanks, Clive. So, in your examples 2 and 3, 'had' had' is suitable and valid. Right?
Hi Krish,

Yes.

Clive
Thanks again, Cl.ive.
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