+0
"half four" or "half past four" when telling the time, I have herd people say "half four", is this acceptable?
+0
Hi,
"half four" or "half past four" when telling the time, I have herd people say "half four", is this acceptable?
I believe 'half four' is characteristic of British English.

There are other ways to say this, eg 4.30 (said as as 'four-thirty').

Clive
1 2 3
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In BrE, it is 'half past four'.
Hi,
When I lived in England, we often used 'half four' in casual spoken English. I'd be surprised if that has changed. Perhaps someone who currently lives there will let us know.

Clive
Hi Clive
CliveHi,
When I lived in England, we often used 'half four' in casual spoken English. I'd be surprised if that has changed. Perhaps someone who currently lives there will let us know.

Clive

The people in my country learn British English. We were never taught to say 'half four'. Maybe our teachers are behind time.Emotion: thinking
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I live in England/Cheshire and I often hear "half four" in everyday use.
I have just heard it today from my plumer.
CliveWhen I lived in England, we often used 'half four' in casual spoken English. I'd be surprised if that has changed. Perhaps someone who currently lives there will let us know

Yes, in England, "half four" (and similar) is common in casual speech and is interchangeable with "half past four". One would use "half past four" in formal contexts.
Hi..
today I asked my hostmother to order a taxi for me at 4.30
She called and said: half four.
So it's still the same =)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Because in class you learn the right way to say things, as Clive said, it's casually spoken.

I'm from Belgium originally and we were taught to say "half past four", however I currently live in England and they do indeed say "half four" when in a casual conversation Emotion: smile
Show more