+0
Does "halfway across the world" mean on the other side of the world? Or is it something else?
Comments  
That rather depends on full context.

The young New Zealander came from halfway across the world to play football for England. >> specifically from halfway around the world

Those vegetables have come halfway across the world to the supermarket shelves >> metaphorically they have come a long way.
Yeah, I'm interested in the meaning in the first sentence - The young New Zealander came from halfway across the world to play football for England.
This meaning I cannot undestand. Is it something like from the other side of the world?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi guys,
What I usually hear is 'halfway around the world'.
Clive
I don't think people stop to calculate the distances. It simply means "From a really long, long way away."
Hi Clive,

It's just for my curiosity. For us, from Vietnam where we live, the States, Canada,or is 'halfway around the world'. We don't use that phrase with or the North / South Pole. Would you use it to talk about how far is from ?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi,
For us, from Vietnam where we live, the States, Canada,or Cuba is 'halfway around the world'. We don't use that phrase with Australia or the North / South Pole. Would you use it to talk about how far Saint Pierre and Miquelon is from Punta Arenas, Chile?

I agree that, with this expression, we do tend to think of it in terms of East/West, more than North/South.
We occasionally say something in the form of 'Puntas Arenas is at the other end of the world from Saint Pierre/Miquelon'.

Clive
Hi Clive,

Thank you! That should answer the question posted by Madhulk - I hope.