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Hello,

The notion of a formal party apparatus was thus a novelty in the 1790s, and when Jefferson and Madison first organized their opposition to the Hamiltonian program, they confined their activities to Congress and did not anticipate creating a long-lived and popular party. But as their antagonism to Hamilton stiffened, and as the amazingly boisterous and widely read newspapers of the day spread their political message, and Hamilton’s, among the people, primitive semblances of political parties began to emerge.

The American Pageant by Thomas A. Bailey.

How can I interpret the part in bold?

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Think of your text like this.

as . . the . . . newspapers of the day spread Jefferson and Madison's political message and Hamilton’s political message among the people, primitive semblances of political parties began of to emerge.

The newspapers told the American population about these policies.

Clive

Comments  
book mango 418 How can I interpret the part in bold?

The newspapers spread both their message and Hamilton's message. They spread these messages among the people. The words "and Hamilton's" are parenthetical, and that is why they are enclosed in commas.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.