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Once again, I need to ask you something from NYC where it is 32F right now.
This time, adverb vs adjective. Let me present two sentences:

A. With a cartoon book,
for hours he sat happily.
B. With a cartoon book,
for hours he sat happy.

Q:
I believe the correct way of saying this is sentence A, with an adverb which modifies the verb "sat".
However, I am hearing sentence B, with an adjective, such in "With an A in English, I am sitting pretty", instead of "I am sitting prettily".

I need a clarification on why using an adjective is acceptable instead of an adverb.

As usual, thanks in advance.

J
Comments  
It seems like that pretty could be adverb, as in "pretty much." Find a dictionary on this.
jazzmasterOnce again, I need to ask you something from NYC where it is 32F right now.
This time, adverb vs adjective. Let me present two sentences:

A. With a cartoon book, for hours he sat happily.
B. With a cartoon book, for hours he sat happy.

Q:
I believe the correct way of saying this is sentence A, with an adverb which modifies the verb "sat".
However, I am hearing sentence B, with an adjective, such in "With an A in English, I am sitting pretty", instead of "I am sitting prettily".

I need a clarification on why using an adjective is acceptable instead of an adverb.

As usual, thanks in advance.

J

It seems like that pretty could be adverb, as in "pretty much." Find a dictionary on this.

Of course, in your example, pretty should just mean prettily.
jazzmasterOnce again, I need to ask you something from NYC where it is 32F right now.
This time, adverb vs adjective. Let me present two sentences:

A. With a cartoon book, for hours he sat happily.
B. With a cartoon book, for hours he sat happy.

Q:
I believe the correct way of saying this is sentence A, with an adverb which modifies the verb "sat".
However, I am hearing sentence B, with an adjective, such in "With an A in English, I am sitting pretty", instead of "I am sitting prettily".

I need a clarification on why using an adjective is acceptable instead of an adverb.

As usual, thanks in advance.

J

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks, Osee.

So are you saying both sentences A and B are correct?

J
Nope. Happy should not be an adverb. So B is not right.
He sat happily. Not He sat happy.
By the way, your word order is highly inverted. That's not wrong in itself, but you might be interested to know the more usual phrasing.
He sat happily with a cartoon book for hours.
And you might also like to know that the term is "comic book" -- if I understand what sort of book you are talking about.
He sat happily with a comic book for hours.
____
to be sitting pretty is an idiom that means to be well positioned, to have an advantage. It is only used in the progressive tenses, and the same pattern cannot be used with other adjectives.
CJ
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Osee:

I finally understand what you are saying. You got "adverb" and "adjective" mixed up.

While happy is an adjective hence sentence A, happily is an adverb hence sentence B.

I believe you wanted to say "Happy should not be adjective, but should be an adverb 'happily'". Right?

J
OseeNope. Happy should not be an adverb. So B is not right.
Thanks CJ:

to be sitting pretty is an idiom that means to be well positioned, to have an advantage. It is only used in the progressive tenses, and the same pattern cannot be used with other adjectives.

... I didn't know that! Emotion: surprise Are there any other idioms that come with adjectives?

J