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It is a logical assumption to say that she may make a fatal mistake in subsequent acts, allowing the townspeople to look into her true self which may in turn anger them; the end of the virtuous life of Abigail will be grave.

Hi, from the analysis below, can you correct the mistakes, please. (had trouble with 'to say that...' Unsure what it modifies etc)

I especially need help with the parts with question marks. Thanks a lot.

It is a logical assumption...=independent clause #1

;the end of the virtuous life of Abigail will be grave=independent clause #2

Independent clause #1

It=subject/dummy it

is=linking verb/verb to be

a=determiner/indefinite article

logical=adjective/pre modifier

assumption=noun/subject complement

to say=infinitive/adjectival post modifier of assumption???

that she may make a fatal mistake in subsequent acts=noun clause/???I don't know what its noun function is...???

allowing the townspeople to look into her true self= present participle phrase/modifying 'she'

which may in turn anger them=relative clause/modifying self???

independent clause #2

The end of the virtuous life=noun phrase

will=modal auxillary

be=linking verb/verb to be

grave=predicate adjective(complement)/adjective
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Comments  (Page 2) 
P.s. sorry about the horrible wording and messy sentences. It's rather late here.
Eddie88 If one tries to identify the head of the noun phrase (and don't bother with identifying the noun phrase), they then have a whole bunch of words around it confusing them.
When we use terms like "the head of the phrase" and "fronting the phrase" I have to think we're not talking about a functional definition. It seems like the complete subject of the sentence would usually be a noun phrase by definition, but would not necessarily begin with a noun. It seems like there are also likely to be nested noun phrases acting as objects of prepositions.

Anyway, it seems naive to call something a noun phrase, thinking that you've somehow disposed of it, or dealt with it, or successfully pigeonholed it in your task of analyzing the sentence.
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Eddie88 It is a logical assumption to say that she may make a fatal mistake in subsequent acts,

Would you agree that 'to say' is a post modifier/adjective for the noun assumption? No. I'd say that the infinitive phrase, "to say X" (alternatively the gerundive phrase, "saying X") - all the way to "acts," is the subject of the sentence. "A logical assumption" is the verb complement.

Would you agree that 'that she may...' is a noun clause functioning as object of the infinitive? Absolutely!
So I'd say the whole infinitive phrase, to "acts," is also a noun phrase because it functions as the subject of the sentence. It has within it a nested noun phrase, acting as object of the infinitive. They lack being identical by only two words.

BTW, I don't think you can say an assumption.

Cheers, - A.
It seems like there are also likely to be nested noun phrases acting as objects of prepositions.

This is true. Nouns function as objects of verbs and prepositions. Therefore, noun phrases do also.

Taking for ever to make up their minds, John and his wife, with little apprehension, care, or dignity, commited insurance fraud.

In bold:

Function: Subject. Head of phrase is John and wife

But it is a noun phrase. There is nothing else you can call these group of words. Every analysis begins by looking at the broadest scope of a sentence and works its way down. Specifically, the head of the phrase is John and wife, but in a broader sense, the bold is a noun phrase, in a broader sense there is a clause, and in a broader sense there is a sentence.

A noun phrase exists for analytical purposes. The easiest way to analyse a sentence is to look at the sentence in the broadest sense and then analyse it more and more specifically.
It seems like there are also likely to be nested noun phrases acting as objects of prepositions.

This is true. Nouns function as objects of verbs and prepositions. Therefore, noun phrases do also.

Taking for ever to make up their minds, John and his wife, with little apprehension, care, or dignity, commited insurance fraud.

In bold:

Function: Subject. Head of phrase is John and wife

But it is a noun phrase. There is nothing else you can call these group of words. Every analysis begins by looking at the broadest scope of a sentence and works its way down. Specifically, the head of the phrase is John and wife; in a broader sense, the bold is a noun phrase; in a broader sense, there is a clause; and in a broader sense, there is a sentence.

A noun phrase exists for analytical purposes. The easiest way to analyse a sentence is to look at the sentence in the broadest sense and then analyse it more and more specifically.
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It is a logical assumption to say that she may make a fatal mistake in subsequent acts, allowing the townspeople to look into her true self which may in turn anger them; the end of the virtuous life of Abigail will be grave

Oh, Avangi, thanks very much! I'm an idiot. Of course the infinitive phrase is the subject of the sentence. I stupidly didn't recognise the 'dummy it' which is the grammatical subject but not the actual subject of the sentence. I completely agree that 'to say...' is the subject of the sentence.

To say that she may make a fatal mistake in subsequent acts is a logical assumption, allowing the townspeople to look into her true self which may in turn anger them

allowing the townspeople to look into her true self=
Particple phrase modifying she

which may in turn anger them= Relative clause modifying 'self'

And yes, it is a messy sentence. It is a foreign student's, which makes it a bit more of struggle to see exactly what phrases modify what at times.

Cheers.

alternatively the gerundive phrase, "saying X

How do you decide whether you use the to infinitve or the gerund? (I use what ever sounds best, but I thought you may have an alternaative reason).
We both use the same method.
Oh, o.k. thought that may be the case.

What about this sentence...

This letter is to confirm the details of your work experience placement as a Marketing Intern at Chrisco, reporting to Miranda.

Do you see the underlined words as a participle phrase modifying 'work experience placement'?

Or an appositive (gerund), in apposition to 'marketing intern at Chrisco?

Cheers, Avangi.
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Sorry, Eddie, I've written three replies to this post and scrapped them all. Maybe tomorrow.

Anyway, I'd say it modifies "intern." Of course it all modifies "placement" indirectly, but it will be the intern who reports. I think this is a case where the semantics are more significant than the syntax in answering your specific question.
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