+0

What is the difference in meaning between these two?


She worked all the harder because her teacher believed in her potential.

She worked harder because her teacher believed in her potential.

+1

I would say that "all the" adds some emphasis or colour to the idea of cause and effect, and can also suggest that she worked (or would have worked) reasonably hard anyway, even without her teacher's encouragement. In some respects it is similar to "even".

Comments  

These are technically grammatical, but the usage is off. They should be something like (the meaning of the following two sentences is similar: her teacher's ridicule of her made her work even harder):


She was feisty and worked all the harder after her teacher said she was dumb.


She was feisty and worked harder after her teacher said she was dumb.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.
TakaWhat is the difference in meaning between these two?

"All the comparative adjective" requires that something be adjective in the first place. In your sentence "She worked all the harder because her teacher believed in her potential.", there is nothing for "all the harder" to be even harder than. It has to be something like "She had always worked hard at school, but when her teacher told her he believed in her potential, she worked all the harder for it."

GPY

I would say that "all the" adds some emphasis or colour to the idea of cause and effect, and can also suggest that she worked (or would have worked) reasonably hard anyway, even without her teacher's encouragement. In some respects it is similar to "even".

Great! Thanks, GPY!

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?