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can I say,

(a) He is harvesting the mangoes with a pole.

(b) He is harvesting to pole the mangoes.
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Hi Vincent,

Your questions are becoming very repetitious. I've suggested to you several times that it would be better for your English if you started trying to write short paragraphs. However, you have never replied to any of my suggestions.

Best wishes, Clive
No, I listen to your advice. I try to write in a short paragraph. But, not all the senteces I write in a short paragraph.

Sometimes, I don't have any idea to write. Sorry. I would try my best. Thanks for your help!!
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Hi,

Please try, Vincent. It really will be a better way to improve your English.

In addition, I and I think other people on the Forum are getting tired of simply correcting lots of very similar sentences. I feel like I have corrected hundreds!

I hope I have not offended you by saying this. Emotion: smile

Clive
Last Sunday afternoon, John and Ali went to their Grandfather orchard. Suddenly, they felt hungry. John suggested to pluck the mangoes to eat.

(a) He was harvesting the mangoes with a pole.

(b) He was harvesting to pole the mangoes.
Hi,

Last Sunday afternoon, John and Ali went to their Grandfather's orchard. Suddenly, they felt hungry. John suggested picking some mangoes to eat. He harvested them with a pole.

Please ask me if you do not understand why I made these changes. I'd be happy to explain.

Best wishes, Clive
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I do not understand why you didn't change "Grandfather" to "grandfather" I'd be happy to receive your explanation. Emotion: smile

Also, why pick? Doespick here mean picking up from the ground - that would be rotten mangoes - or selecting?. What's wrong with pluck?
Hi,

I do not understand why you didn't change "Grandfather" to "grandfather" I'd be happy to receive your explanation. Emotion: smile It's a good idea. I just didn't think about it.

Also, why pick? Doespick here mean picking up from the ground - that would be rotten mangoes - or selecting?. What's wrong with pluck?

'Pick up' means from the ground, as you say. The common term for taking fruit from a tree is 'pick'.

'Pluck' is more commonly used for flowers. It suggests pulling hard. You pluck a chicken.

Best wishes, Clive
Your chicken example reminds me of my old post on this topic. I guess the answer didn't sink in. Sorry.
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