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A. Our training has as its goal to develop lawyers professionally to ensure they have the necessary skills required in their role as a lawyer.

I just found A on Google, but should A be written with "it" as in B because "has" lacks its direct object.

B. Our training has it as its goal to develop lawyers professionally to ensure they have the necessary skills required in their role as a lawyer.

In B, it refers to "to develop lawyers professionally".

So, my questions are

1. Are both sentences A and B correct?

2. In sentence A, is this part "to develop lawyers professionally " used as a direct object of "has" ?

3. Is there a construction similar to "has as its goal to do"?


Personally, I think sentence A is wrong unless A is rewritten with dashes to indicate "to develop lawyers professionally" as a noun phrase as the direct object of "has", as in "Our training has as its goal -to develop lawyers professionally - to ensure they have the necessary skills required in their role as a lawyer"

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fire11. Are both sentences A and B correct?

(A) is theoretically possible if "to develop lawyers professionally" is taken as the object of "has", but in practice it reads incorrectly, or at least very awkwardly, to me. (B) also feels awkward. The obvious way to write this part is "... has as its goal the development ..." (but then the rest of the sentence has to be fixed up too).

fire1"Our training has as its goal -to develop lawyers professionally - to ensure they have the necessary skills required in their role as a lawyer"

The dashes make things worse, not better.

By the way, you have typed hyphens, not dashes.

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Setting aside the labels "right" and "wrong", let's just say that both A and B are less than optimal. Here's my opinion of how it should be written.

The goal of our training is to develop lawyers professionally to ....


'Y has as its X' is an inferior transformation (my opinion) of 'The X of Y is'. The meaning is the same.

Likewise:

The goal of aikido is to achieve inner peace and harmony.
OR Aikido has as its goal to achieve inner peace and harmony.

The dominant religion of Kalmykia is Buddhism.
OR Kalmykia has Buddhism as its dominant religion.

The societal role of the capital markets is to do a good job allocating capital.
OR The capital markets have as their societal role to do a good job allocating capital.

The version with 'has/have' is particularly disturbing if the complement is an infinitive construction.

CJ

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Comments  
GPY(A) is theoretically possible if "to develop lawyers professionally" is taken as the object of "has", but in practice it reads incorrectly, or at least very awkwardly, to me. (B) also feels awkward. The obvious way to write this part is "... has as its goal the development ..." (but then the rest of the sentence has to be fixed up too).

Hmm.. then in sentence A, is "has as its goal" a wrong usage?

If you google "has as its goal to", you can see it written in a lot of English books, so I was somewhat surprised to read your answer.

fire1Hmm.. then in sentence A, is "has as its goal" a wrong usage?

"has as its goal" is fine in itself. It is what follows that seems faulty/awkward to me.

fire1If you google "has as its goal to", you can see it written in a lot of English books

Yes, I guess opinions vary. Perhaps other forum members can comment too.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
fire1I just found A on Google, but should A be written with "it" as in B because "has" lacks its direct object.

Yes, but nobody does it, and I do mean nobody, so it's moot. The entire infinitive clause is the object, and everybody knows it, so some grammarians are just going to have to live with their panties in a bunch. The sense of it would put everything in a different order (Our training has to develop lawyers professionally to ensure they have the necessary skills required in their role as a lawyer as its goal.) but as always, the long clause gets moved for the reader's sake, and the "it" seems unnecessary.

fire1I think sentence A is wrong unless A is rewritten with dashe

No. The infinitives stack.