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Hi,

Wondering if we say "the store has been open since 1999" or "the store has been opend since 1999".

Thank you for any help.

Aline
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Comments  
"open" is the state of being open while"opened" is the action of being opened. In your sentence your are describing a state, not an action.
"The store has been open since 1999" describes a state of being or condition. So which sentence do you think is the right one?

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Huevos "open" is the state of being open while"opened" is the action of being opened. In your sentence your are describing a state, not an action.
Hi Huevos,
I know what you say is correct, but I guess I'm a protest committee of one. There are many actions which have a rather permanent effect on their objects, and we often use the past participle as an adjective to subsequently describe those objects. I just broke the lightbulb. Look! See the broken lightbulb!

Open doors and "Open for Business" are natural enough, but I have a problem with cans which are not designed to be resealed - the kind you use canopeners on. I think you should be able to say, "There's an open/opened can of dog food in the fridge."

I know you're up to the task of blowing this full of holes.

Best regards, - A.
AvangiI know you're up to the task of blowing this full of holes.
OED says the adjective is "open". It doesn't mention "opened" as an alternative. OED reflects Standard English but in another dialect "opened" might be considered the adjective, especially when we consider that "open" is irregular which is really what you are pointing out.
AvangiThere are many actions which have a rather permanent effect on their objects
Whether the state entered into is permanent or temporary doesn't have any bearing on the regular model where the past participle is used as the adjective. In your example you use "broken" which could reflect either a temporary or permanent state, i.e. a broken leg or a broken light bulb.
Thanks, Huevos
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AlineYiuWondering if we say "the store has been open since 1999" or "the store has been opened since 1999".
Welcome to English Forums!
Assuming you mean open for business continuously since 1999, you need the first one because you need the adjective open, not the verb form opened.
Assuming you mean literally open continuously since 1999, that is, nobody ever closed the door to the place night or day for all that time, you also need the first one. But I doubt you mean this.
If you mean that someone physically took hold of the closed door of the place and made it open -- at least once since 1999 -- then use the second one. But I doubt you mean this, either. It's a rather bizarre thing to say. Emotion: smile

CJ
AvangiI just broke the lightbulb. Look! See the broken lightbulb!
The problem is that with most verbs, including break, the past participle (broken) also serves as the adjective. So there's no difference between these:
The lightbulb has been broken since 1999. (adjective - in the state of being broken)

The lightbulb has been broken since 1999. (verb - caused to be broken)
open is a different case because we have both the past participle opened (for use as a verb) and an adjectival form open. So there is a difference between these:
The store has been open since 1999. (adjective - in the state of being open)

The store has been opened since 1999. (verb - caused to be open)

The second version of each is a little weird with the since clause. They force an unusual reading.

CJ
AlineYiuthe store has been open since 1999" or "the store has been opend since 1999".
The store has been open since 1999.

The store was opened in 1999.
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