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HellO Teachers,

A senetnce like "He has been reading since morning."(only)

If I have to insert some adverb in this sentence , then what would be the most neutral position.

Should I insert an adverb after first helping verb?

Are any special rule for this?

Thanks.
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Hello!
I'm not a teacher here, but I'll try to answer your question:
I wouldn't add an adverb such as "only" in this sentence, but I'd reprase it : "he's been doing nothing but reading since morning", IF this is the meaning you want to give to the sentence.
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Additionally, 'only' modifies the word it sits closest to:

Only he has been reading since morning.
He only has been reading since morning.
He, only, has been reading since morning. (He alone)
He has only been reading since morning.
He has been only reading since morning.
He has been reading only since morning.
He has been reading since morning only.

Which meaning are you looking for?
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Comments  
The most usual position when you have one or more helping verbs in the sentence is after the first helping verb, yes. I'd say, whenever you're not sure, guess that it's after the first helping verb, and you'll be right most of the time! Emotion: smile
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A senetnce like "He has been reading since morning."(only)
If I have to insert some adverb in this sentence , then what would be the most neutral position.
Should I insert an adverb after first helping verb?
Are any special rule for this?


No special rules, adverbs can usually be stuck all over the place. You will want to insert 'only' before what you want 'only' to control.

1a. He has been reading only since morning, (not last night)
1b. He has been only reading since morning, (not gardening)