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Hello,

The best movie I have ever seen is Shrek.

1. I just read from another thread that the above sentence is the correct version instead of using 'was'. I wonder if the following is also correct. Do you think so?

The best movie I have ever seen has been Shrek.

2. Incidentally, I was wondering if I should have written 'I have just read...' instead of 'I just read...'. Which is correct in this context? What is the difference?

3. Does 'just' should always go with the present perfect and never for the simple past?

I would be very pleased with your assistance. Thank you so much.
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AnonymousI wonder if the following is also correct. Do you think so?

The best movie I have ever seen has been Shrek.
No. You don't want this. It's not exactly wrong grammatically, but it's not natural to say The best [movie / book / program / scene / ...] ... has been ....
Anonymous2. Incidentally, I was wondering if I should have written 'I have just read...' instead of 'I just read...'. Which is correct in this context? What is the difference?
Both are used in the US. I am told that the British prefer the version with have.
Anonymous3. Does 'just' should always go with the present perfect and never for the simple past?
I recommend the present perfect, even though you will hear it with the simple past, especially, as I said above, in the US.

CJ
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Oh, thank you so much for your explanations. It makes sense to me now.
CalifJimBoth are used in the US. I am told that the British prefer the version with have.
Does it mean there is no difference or any subtle difference at all?
CalifJim
Anonymous3. Does 'just' should always go with the present perfect and never for the simple past?
I recommend the present perfect, even though you will hear it with the simple past, especially, as I said above, in the US.
I believe the same goes with the word 'recently' and the present perfect is preferred since the present perfect actually implies 'recently'. Is this correct?

I wonder if the simple past contradicts the meaning of 'recently' because the simple past rather casts the action further to the past, I think. I would really appreciate your opinion on this. Emotion: smile
Sorry to add this...
CalifJimit's not natural to say The best [movie / book / program / scene / ...] ... has been ....
If I rearrange the sentence and ommiting the dependent clause, do you think its correct to use 'has been' with the word 'best'?

Shrek has been the best movie.
Hi CJ,

I understand this thread is a week old. I hope you don't mind commenting on this. Thanks.
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AnonymousDoes it mean there is no difference or any subtle difference at all?
I wouldn't say that there is no difference. I would say that there is a slight difference.
AnonymousI believe the same goes with for the word 'recently' and the present perfect is preferred since the present perfect actually implies 'recently'. Is this correct?
Yes and no. That sounds like a reasonable approach, but see my remarks below.
AnonymousI wonder if the simple past contradicts the meaning of 'recently' because the simple past rather casts the action further to the past, I think. I would really appreciate your opinion on this.
No. The difference between the two tenses is not related to how recently the action took place. Nevertheless, because the present perfect talks about a situation that continues to have effect up to the present, it is more likely to be useful for describing recent events. On the other hand, the simple past can also be used to describe very recent events as well as events which happened hundreds of years ago.

In the final analysis it is often the speaker's choice whether he wants to cast the action as impinging on the present state of affairs (present perfect) or as "cut off" from the present (simple past), even if it is as recent as several seconds ago.

CJ