Hi,

I am confused over the usage of has/is(present tense).

For example:

Either the teachers or the principal has to be responsible for the year-end festival.

Or

Either the teachers or the principal is responsible for the year-end festival.

I am perplexed on when to use has and when to use is since both of them are presen tense.

Thanks!

Cheers,

Jennifer Unagi!:)
jenniferunagiEither the teachers or the principal has to be responsible for the year-end festival.
Or
Either the teachers or the principal is responsible for the year-end festival.
You can use either one, depending on what you mean.

1. has to be responsible = is required to be responsible

2. is responsible = is responsible (an already established fact)

1. is probably said while planning the festival. 2. is probably said after responsibilities have already been assigned during the planning.

CJ
Thanks!


Either the teachers or the principal is responsible for the year-end festival.


Can this sentence be changed to:


Either the teachers or the principal is to be responsible for the year-end festival.

Cheers,

Jennifer Unagi:)
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Also, can I phrase it like:

Neither the principal nor the teachers were at fault(since the incident had happened rather than using are at fault)

Thanks for all the help. I appreciate it!

Cheers,

Jennifer Unagi!:)
jenniferunagiEither the teachers or the principal is responsible for the year-end festival.
Can this sentence be changed to:
Either the teachers or the principal is to be responsible for the year-end festival.
No. The second is like:

Either the teachers or the principal is going to be responsible for the year-end festival.

OR

Either the teachers or the principal will be responsible for the year-end festival.

OR

Either the teachers or the principal will be assigned the responsibility for the year-end festival.

CJ
jenniferunagiAlso, can I phrase it like:
Neither the principal nor the teachers were at fault
I take it you've changed what you're talking about. This is a completely different sentence than you started with. Yes, you can say that.

Neither the principal nor the teachers are at fault. At the moment I am saying this.

Neither the principal nor the teachers were at fault. At that moment in the past, most likely referring to the time when the accident happened.

CJ
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Would it be acceptable to use the following adjustments?

Either the teachers have or the principal has to be responsible for the year-end festival.

Either the teachers are or the principal is responsible for the year-end festival.