1 2 3 4
This thread has growed from a single post.

... but it shouldn't be blowed out of proportion.

... or it might get throwed away.
Regards,
Arfur
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it hasn't snowed overnight". "That's funny," I replied, "I would always ... not well read or well studied, teach me a word that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

OED has it as dialect but I bet few have come across it.
John Dean
Oxford
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
... but it shouldn't be blowed out of proportion.

... or it might get throwed away.

Looks like the "sow is the only word" theory has been comprehensively mown down and shown the door.

John Dean
Oxford
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it ... that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

OED has it as dialect but I bet few have come across it.

Or its antonym, snot nown.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
John Dean schrieb:
... or it might get throwed away.

Looks like the "sow is the only word" theory has been comprehensively mown down and shown the door.

Yeah, rub it in, I deserve it!
This morning, though, I really couldn't think of all these other obvious (more obvious than "sow" now) words - at least until I read Raymond's post, at which point I kicked myself.
I had hoped someone would feel tickled to improve upon my poem, which certainly left much room to do so.
Cheers
Michael

On a boat I had her rown
upon the tranquil river flown
whilst the fullest moon a-glown
where the snow had freshly snown.
By the time the *** had crown
she had finally to me she shown
that indeed she loved me sown.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it ... that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

"If I were a bear and a big bear too I wouldn't much care if froze or snew."

A bit of trivia concerning the verb "snow": According to The Century Dictionary the verb "snow," in Middle English, "snowen" and "snawen," was formed from the noun, the original verb in Middle English being "snewen" and "sniwen," from Old English "sniwian."
The poem you cite reminded me of a poem I wrote a few years ago:

"Brr!" said the bear.
The bear said, "Brr!
It's colder here
Than anywhrr!"

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
> The poem you cite reminded me of a poem I wrote a few years ago:
"Brr!" said the bear. The bear said, "Brr! It's colder here Than anywhrr!"

Ah guiss thet bar
Set ba the far.
When he'd warmed his fur,
He didn't say "Grr!"
No mur.
Mike.
Here is the correct usage "It snowed overnight, therefore it has snown overnight."
~Iain
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Here is the correct usage "It snowed overnight, therefore it has snown overnight." ~Iain

Snow is a regular verb:-
snow, snowed, snowed.
DC
Show more