My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it hasn't snowed overnight".

"That's funny," I replied, "I would always ask whether it has snown".

I then came downstairs and consulted Google which only has 821 entries for "snown". Oh dear, it seems that I must tell my wife that her usage is entirely correct.
So did my father, who was usually pretty accurate with his language albeit not well read or well studied, teach me a word that just doesn't exist?
Has anyone else come across "snown"?
1 2 3 4
Stephen Lewis schrieb:
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it hasn't snowed overnight". "That's funny," I replied, "I would always ... not well read or well studied, teach me a word that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

No, sorry.
The only -ow word I can think of that still has a -own past participle is sow.
Cheers
Michael

On a boat I had her rown
upon the tranquil river flown
whilst the fullest moon a-glown
where the snow had freshly snown
when finally to me she shown
that indeed she loved me sown.
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it hasn't snowed overnight". "That's funny," I replied, "I would always ... not well read or well studied, teach me a word that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

Well, it's a nonstandard usage, that's for sure. It looks like your father, or someone earlier that he was imitating, turned a regular verb into an irregular verb on the model of such verbs as "know," "show," and "throw."

As it happens, the "n" in the past participles of these verbs appears to represent the early Germanic infinitive ending "-en." "Know," "show," and "throw" were, in Middle English, "knowen," "shewen," and "throwen" there were other spelling variants. (For that matter, go back far enough in Middle English and you find the infinitive for "be" is "been" or "ben.") As it happens, "snow" was "snowen" in Middle English, but I think it more likely that the form "snown" is a modern re-do of the word than a survival from olden times.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it ... that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

Well, it's a nonstandard usage, that's for sure. It looks like your father, or someone earlier that he was imitating, ... of the word than a survival from olden times.A lot of water has flown under the bridge since then.

Ray
Michael Mendelsohn typed thusly:
Stephen Lewis schrieb:

My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it ... that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

No, sorry. The only -ow word I can think of that still has a -own past participle is sow.

I would't have knowed that.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Michael Mendelsohn typed thusly:

Stephen Lewis schrieb: No, sorry. The only -ow word I can think of that still has a -own past participle is sow.

I would't have knowed that.

This thread has growed from a single post.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Michael Mendelsohn typed thusly: I would't have knowed that.

This thread has growed from a single post.

... but it shouldn't be blowed out of proportion.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
My wife said to me this morning, "I hope it hasn't snowed overnight". "That's funny," I replied, "I would always ... not well read or well studied, teach me a word that just doesn't exist? Has anyone else come across "snown"?

"If I were a bear and a big bear too
I wouldn't much care if froze or snew."

Phil C.
Well, it's a nonstandard usage, that's for sure. It looks ... re-do of the word than a survival from olden times.

A lot of water has flown under the bridge since then.

Can water lose its pilot's licence for doing that?

Mike.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more