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RotterSo the phrase 'In the good old days' is an adverbial phrase.
It means the phrase modifies a verb.
For me the verb have is the main verb and the verb did is the auxillary verb.
I may be wrong.
Which verb does it modify?
My guess is the main verb which is have.
That is an interesting question.

When I think about a verb in a sentence, that can be actually more than one word.

In some languages, there is no question, because endings on the verb create the meanings of tense, mood, voice, and aspect. In English grammar, these meanings are conveyed by multiple words (a verb phrase), and the words taken together form the "verb."

So there is only one verb in your example sentence. The main verb is have. The helping verb (do) has to be added in order to create the negation and past tense. So the verb is the phrase did have. If you make the sentence positive, then one word will work for the verb...

In the good old days we (subject) didn't have the Internet and mobile phones (compound object).

In the good old days we had entertaining radio programs.
Thanks AlpheccaStars for taking time again to reply me.

I wish I knew English grammar like you!

Here the phrase 'did have' work as a single verb.

I have never ever heard this English language phenomenon.

You have written the following:

In some languages, there is no question, because endings on the verb create the meanings of tense, mood, voice, and aspect.

In French

Au bon vieux temps, nous n'avions ni Internet ni téléphone portable.

In the good old days we didn't have the Internet and mobile phones.

Au bon vieux temps [ In the good old days]

Nous avons Internet et téléphone portable. [ We have the Internet and mobile phones.]

Nous avions Internet et téléphone portable. [ We had the Internet and mobile phones.]

The negation comes with '' n'avions ''

To be candid my French is rotten.

However, I practice my French with some people at the gym.

I always speak French with those West African and Maghreb people.

I train 3 times a week. I've trained 100 minutes this evening.
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