Her father died of a heart attack. I know her very well because we worked together in a company. I don't work in that company any longer.

She told me, those days, her dad was suffering from high-blood pressure and eating tablets every day.

A couple of weeks ago, I met her accidentally and she told me about the demise of her father.

People who take medications for diabetes, high blood pressure, etc can get a stroke or heart attack at any time.
[DOCTORS HAVE TOLD ME THIS.]

She has a sister too. They have sold his car. Because they don't need it.


  1. He has a car. [ This is incorrect.]

  2. He had a car. [ This is correct because his daughters sold it.]

  3. He has two daughters.

  4. He had two daughters.
His two daughters are alive.

I am not sure about my 3rd and 4th sentences.

Which is the correct one in this context?

When his daughters are dead, I think the 4th sentence is fine.

If they kept the car, I would write the 1st sentence. I may be wrong.

Your thoughts are welcome.
1 2
Here are some thoughts:

Her father died of a heart attack. I know her very well because we worked together in a company. I don't work in that company any longer.

She told me that in those days, her dad was suffering from high-blood pressure and taking (swallowing) tablets every day. (Tablets are not eaten because they are not food.)
A couple of weeks ago, I met her accidentally and she told me about the demise of her father.

People who take medications for diabetes, high blood pressure, etc. can suffer a stroke or heart attack at any time.[DOCTORS HAVE TOLD ME THIS.]

She has a sister too. They have sold his car because they don't need it.

He has a car. [ This is incorrect.] True. If he is dead, say "His estate / his heirs own(s) his car."
He had a car. [ This is correct because his daughters sold it.] True.
He has two daughters.
He had two daughters.
His two daughters are alive.
I am not sure about my 3rd and 4th sentences.
Which is the correct one in this context?

I prefer "He had two daughters." The verb had has the meaning that the daughters were born to the father and his wife. It says nothing about the daughters' current state - living or dead.

When his daughters are dead, I think the 4th sentence is fine. True.
Thanks AlpheccaStars for the reply.

You have written the following:
She told me that in those days, her dad was suffering from high-blood pressure and taking (swallowing) tablets every day. (Tablets are not eaten because they are not food.)

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I would agree it sounds odd to say eating tablets. It should be taking tablets.

She told me that in those days, her dad was suffering from ...

I think the conjunction 'that' is optional. Why did you insert it?
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RotterShe told me that in those days, her dad was suffering from ...
I think the conjunction 'that' is optional. Why did you insert it?
Because the that helps associate the adverb phrase in those days to the correct verb by putting it within the confines of a clausal unit.

Compare these various adverb placements:

In those days she told me frogs had wings. (Verb modified is "told.")

She told me in those days frogs had wings. (Does the adverb phrase modify "told" or "had"? The reader has just heard the verb "told" so immediately assumes that is the verb being modified. Then the rest of the sentence comes, and there is confusion.)

She told me that in those days frogs had wings. (It is clear that the verb modified is "had.")
Thanks AlpheccaStar for taking time to reply me again.

I am not clever as you when it comes to English grammar.

I know I am good at gym training. I just came home after 100 minutes long training session.

I weigh 60-62 kilos and the blood pressure is around 117/66 thanks to the sternous gym training schedule.

Nowadays I drive a SAAB.

Some years ago I had a Toyota.

5.Those days I drove a Toyota.

6 In those days I drove a Toyota.

Are both fine?

I know it is fine to say 'In the good old days I drove a Toyota'.
When you put "ago" after a time phrase, it makes an adverb phrase, answering the question "When?"

When did he call?- He called ten minutes ago.

When did you go to school? - Many years ago.

However "those days" is clearly a noun phrase. It works fine as a subject:

Those days were the good old days.

Those days went by quickly.

To make an adverb phrase with "those days", you need to make it the object of a preposition (prepositional phrases can function as adjectives or adverbs), although in very casual conversation, sometimes people do forget it.

In those days, the hermit lived in a shabby hut.

I frequently hear "these days" used adverbally, meaning "nowadays." In this case, the preposition is usually dropped.

It seems like we get ripped off a lot these days.
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Thanks AlpheccaStars

These things are tough grammar for me.

Those days were the good old days.

Those days went by quickly.

So the words 'Those days' are nouns in the above sentences.

…...................................................................................................................................

In those days, the hermit lived in a shabby hut.

The words 'In those days' are a prepositional phrase and it makes an adverb.

Here 'the hermit' is the subject.

…...................................................................................................................................

He called ten minutes ago.

In the above the words 'ten minutes ago' are an adverb or rather an adverbial phrase.

[Maybe my understanding of these grammatical aspects are inaccurate. If so, please tell me.]

…..............................................................................................................................

In the good old days we didn't have the Internet and mobile phones.

I guess the words 'In the good old days' are an adjectival phrase.

Please tell me if I am wrong.
RotterIn the good old days we didn't have the Internet and mobile phones.
I guess the words 'In the good old days' are an adjectival phrase.
Please tell me if I am wrong.
In the good old days is an adverbial phrase. It answers the question when?

Compare with this sentence:

Do you see the man in the big hat?

In the big hat is an adjectival phrase because it describes the man.
Thanks AlpheccaStars for taking time again to reply me.

For me it is a tall order to judge whether it is an adverbial or adjectival phrase.

Being a native speaker it is easy for you.

In the good old days we didn't have the Internet and mobile phones.

So the phrase 'In the good old days' is an adverbial phrase.

It means the phrase modifies a verb.

For me the verb have is the main verb and the verb did is the auxillary verb.

I may be wrong.

Which verb does it modify?

My guess is the main verb which is have.

........................................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................................

Please look at the following when possible,

Those days were the good old days.

Those days went by quickly.

So the words 'Those days' are nouns in the above sentences.

I am not sure.
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