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Can both the two question tags be correct? -It has to be that, hasn't it/doesn't it?-We have to go, haven't we/don't we?-She has not this, has she/does she?-They have a good day, haven't they/don't they?
Are the following within a set identical in meaning and usage? -I've got to do my homework.-I've to do my homework.??? -I have to do my homework.
-She has not this. -She has not got this. -She does not have this.
-Has she this? -Has she got this? -Does she have this?
These negative ones are all wrong or not possible, aren't they? -I've not got to do my homework.??? -I've not to do my homework.??? -I have not to do my homework.??
Thanks for your comment!
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The tag question uses the auxiliary that is, or would be used with the main verb.

If the main verb is negated, the tag is positive and vice versa.
The tenses match.

She doesn't live here, does she?
She lives here, doesn't she?
He is doing his homework, isn't he?
He was doing his homework, wasn't he?
He's not doing his homework, is he?

Modal auxiliaries

He shouldn't go, should he?
He ought to go, oughtn't he?
He can go, can't he?
He wouldn't go, would he?

Here is a complete reference: https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/tag-questions.htm

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healerIt has to be that, hasn't it?

No. People seldom use 'have' like that anymore these days.

American English turned away from that around 1950, and British English about 25 years later.

That means that nowadays you use auxiliary do for questions and negations of non-auxiliary 'have', although you'll find that some people still use the older forms.

So you may want to keep these older patterns in mind because you might see them in older writings, and you'll want to be able to recognize them when you read them.

healerIt has to be that, hasn't it/doesn't it?
We have to go, haven't we/don't we?
She has not this, She doesn't have this, has she/does she?
They have a good day, haven't they/don't they?
They are having a good day, aren't they?
I've got to do my homework.
I've to do my homework.
I have to do my homework.
She has not this.
She has not got this. OR She hasn't got this.
She does not have this.
Has she this?
Has she got this?
Does she have this?
I've not got to do my homework.
I've not to do my homework.
I have not to do my homework.
I don't have to do my homework.

See above.

CJ

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Comments  

But, the auxiliary, have, in perfect tenses is used in the tag question:

He has done his homework, hasn't he?
He hasn't done his homework, has he?
He has been very naughty today, hasn't he?
He hadn't left on time, had he?

When "have" is the main verb, or "have to" is the auxiliary, "do" (or the appropriate auxiliary) is used in the tag.

He has to go now, doesn't he?
I have to leave right now, don't I?
I have only two apples, don't I?
We don't have any milk in the fridge, do we?
Trump will go to prison, won't he?
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Thanks a lot!
Could you please verify the following question tags? -I've got to do my homework, don't I? -I have to do my homework, don't I? -She has not got this, has she?-She hasn't got this, has she? -She does not have this, does she? -I don't have to do my homework, do I?
While I got you there, I would like to ask you the following.In answering question tags, we say yes or no in accordance with the fact, not the validity of the asker's statement. What about regular questions without question tag? If I remember correctly it should be the same, yes or no according to the fact, not whether the question is describing the correct situation. Please comment! Thanks!
Thanks for further clarification.

Please make your examples concrete. Avoid pronouns that have no reference such as "this" and "that". I have replaced them.

-I've got to do my homework, don't I?

-I have to do my homework, don't I?

-She has not got any idea, has she?

-She hasn't got a clue, has she?

-She does not have covid, does she?

-I don't have to do my homework, do I?

healerWhile I got you there, I would like to ask you the following.In answering question tags, we say yes or no in accordance with the fact, not the validity of the asker's statement. What about regular questions without question tag? If I remember correctly it should be the same, yes or no according to the fact, not whether the question is describing the correct situation. Please comment! Thanks!

When someone asks your a question, just assume they are not being deceptive. Just answer according to your best knowledge. The presence of a question tag does not affect the answer. The question tags are mostly for conversation.


Kid: I've got to do my homework, don't I?
Mom: Of course you do, young man. Go to your room and get started.

Kid: I have to do my homework, don't I?
Mom: Of course you do, young man. Go to your room and get started.

Kid: Do I have to do my homework?
Mom: Of course you do, young man. Go to your room and get started.

Sarah: She has not got any idea, has she?
Jane: I guess not. Nobody has told her that her boyfriend has been cheating on her.

Sarah: She hasn't got a clue, has she?
Jane: I guess not. Nobody has told her that her boyfriend has been cheating on her.

Sarah: She does not have covid, does she?
Jane: I don't think so. She told me her test was negative.
Jane: Actually, she does. She told me her test was positive, but her case is very mild.

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Thanks very much for your response with plenty of examples. I apologise that I might not have made myself clear. I read again what I had written and I could have misled you. I'm sorry. The last question I asked was only concerning if one should say yes or say no in response to a question. When I read the website you recommended, i.e. https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/tag-questions.htm , I came across the following.


_Be very careful about answering tag questions. In some languages, an opposite system of answering is used, and non-native English speakers sometimes answer in the wrong way. This can lead to a lot of confusion!Answer a tag question according to the truth of the situation. Your answer reflects the real facts, not (necessarily) the question.

In some languages, people answer a question like "Snow isn't black, is it?" with "Yes" (meaning "Yes, I agree with you"). This is the wrong answer in English!_


I was asking if it is the same rule for dealing with questions without tags.

Below are examples from the site.


_-Snow is white, isn't it?Yes (it is).-Snow isn't white, is it?Yes it is!-Snow is black, isn't it?No it isn't!

-Snow isn't black, is it?No (it isn't)_


Do the same rules apply to regular questions? Are the answers yes or no to the following questions correct? This is what I meant to ask. -Is snow white? Yes (it is). -Isn't snow white? Yes it is!??? -Is snow black? No it isn't! -Isn't snow black? No (it isn't)??? Thanks again for your time and trouble.