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Hopefully, someone could help me unravel this mystery.

I have been firmly believing that "it" cannot be left out in the following context.

A) I hate it that you are always rumpling my hair playfully.

However, according to this URL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That-clause , it can be an ellipsis as well in this sort of contexts.

So, the sentence will become like this:

B) I hate that you are always rumpling my hair playfully.

Another example:

I like (it) when she comes to visit.

That's where my question is. "Hate" is not like the verbs that can take "that-clause" as objects.

Therefore, I am a bit doubtful whether the "it" can be grammatically omitted.

By the way, could you tell me why some verbs like "hate", usually emotional verbs, cannot take "that-clause" as objects, whereas other verbs like "accept" can take "that-clause" as objects.

What are the main differences in their properties that make them behave in such different ways?

Thank you.
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As far as I'm concerned the 'it' can be omitted in all those cases. I don't see any such restriction on emotion verbs; where did you get that information? I would say that it is sometimes informal, that formal writing would see a restructuring (I hate your playfully rumpling my hair), but I cannot see that it cannot be done.
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Mister Micawberthat formal writing would see a restructuring (I hate your playfully rumpling my hair),

Do you encourage this formal pattern(I hate your playfully rumpling my hair) in academic writing?

is it called normalisation?
I would encourage it here; I don't call it anything. Where did you get the term?
Mister MicawberI would encourage it here; I don't call it anything. Where did you get the term?
Normalization is all about changing your sentence from verb-oriented structure to noun-oriented one.

for example:

I would like to complain to your manager about your service.

We should try to avoid using verbs too much, so we change to

I would like to make a complaint about your service to your manager.

Normalization also encourages trying to incorporating as much as information into a noun phrase through the pre- & post- modifiers.

I am not sure of it, but I think it is better for academic writing.
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Well, judging from the definitions you have given, I certainly wouldn't call it 'normal', but I understand the term now and agree with your comment.