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Dear Experts,

Recently I hear an expression "Have a good one." quite often.
What does it mean and how is it usually used?

Thank you.
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"Have a nice day" = "Have a good day" = "Have a good one!"

Usually, at the end of a conversation.
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Hi

This can be used in a lot of instances where the meaning is clear and where you would normally use:

have a good + noun

Some examples

Have a good day - have a good one

Have a good weekend - have a good one

Have a good game of golf - have a good one

Have a good holiday - have a good one

But we need the meaning to be clear, usually from preceding information:

A - I'm going on holiday tomorrow.

B - Hey, have a good one!
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Comments  
Thank you Grammar Geek!
 Optilang's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
optilang, 
thank you for the clear explanation!
This saying originated a very long time ago in the military.

From the first days of paratrooping. . . . . this saying was used to wish the troops well which were soon to be exiting the aircraft in a para drop. Specifically it was meant to have a good landing.
It's a way to respond to anyone you dont care to give an honest responce.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
As the originator of the phrase in the mid-to-late 70's, I can say that optilang's answer is correct. It's generic; it means, whatever you're going to do, have a good one.

I like George Carlin's response. He said, "I already have a good one--I want a longer one."
AnonymousAs the originator of the phrase in the mid-to-late 70's, I can say that optilang's answer is correct.
This is amazing! Never before in the history of English Forums have we ever heard from the very originator of an idiom himself!

CJ
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