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Hi,

If you could answer the following questions?

(1) It is true that the variations "have a grudge against smb" and "hold a grudge against smb" are both quite common in modern English? (The variant with "hold" is a bit more formal though?)

On the other hand, the expression "bear a grudge against smb" would sound rather antiquated to native speakers, wouldn't it?

(2) Are there some other idioms that you think are pretty close to [+] in meaning?

Your usage examples would be greatly appreciated!

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vlivef(1) It is true that the variations "have a grudge against smb" and "hold a grudge against smb" are both quite common in modern English? (The variant with "hold" is a bit more formal though?)On the other hand, the expression "bear a grudge against smb" would sound rather antiquated to native speakers, wouldn't it?

This graph shows you that all three expressions are in approximately equal use in modern English:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=have+a+grudge+against%2Chold+a+grudge+against%2C+bear+a+grudge+against&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3

vlivefOn the other hand, the expression "bear a grudge against smb" would sound rather antiquated to native speakers, wouldn't it?

No.

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Thank you, GPY! ( It's not for the first time that I jump to conclusions when checking/analysing usage examples based on English corpora or Google Books NGrams :-( ... sorry!)

If you couild also answer the second of my questions? (= similar idioms)

Thanks a lot!

vlivefIf you couild also answer the second of my questions? (= similar idioms)

I can't think of anything offhand that means exactly the same. There are words such as these, which can be used in combinations such as "feel ~ towards someone". Possibly the closest to "grudge" is "feel resentment towards someone".